Omoda

"Since we started working with Starred our Net Promoter Score grew from 46 to 58"

We’re excited to have our clients share their experiences using Starred - how they gather feedback and how they process the results within their organisations. This is an interview with Jan Pieter Honkoop. As customer happiness manager at Omoda, Jan Pieter is responsible, among other things, for the maintenance and continued growth in customer satisfaction.

‘Nothing is too crazy in the solution we offer’, and with that we go to any length.

Can you introduce Omoda?

We’re a shoe retailer and we’ve been online since 2007, but we began in physical shops and we’re still expanding on that front. Currently we have 17 branches. We focus on luxury style, realised through our collections, the design of our locations, and the high level of service we offer customers. Nothing is too crazy in the solution we offer, and with that we go to any length - not only in problem or complaint situations, but also in moments which clients don’t expect. For example, a bouquet of flowers for a hospital visit, or a surprise on a birthday. Our staff have a lot of freedom when it comes to this.

What, for example, best exemplifies your customer-centricity?

A visitor at one of our branches was very disappointed that we could not provide what they needed, and they also did not live near to one of our other stores where they had the shoes they wanted. In the end one of our employees got in the car, with two different sizes of the shoe, and went to the customer’s address. The customer was very happy, of course, that she had the shoes in time for her special occasion.

How did Omoda measure customer satisfaction before working with Starred?

Before we gathered information primarily via our loyalty programme. This feedback was mainly product-related, but we saw that some customers also gave their views on the purchasing experience. For the rest we relied on direct contact with the customer in the shop or via customer support.


‘We didn’t really have any idea what was going on in the shops’

We noticed that staff and shop managers were in need of structural insights into what made customers happy and what needed improving to get there. With customer remarks it was never certain whether it was indicative of a structural problem, or a situational snapshot. We didn’t really have any idea what was going on in the shops. With Starred we now get feedback from shop visitors, quickly and without a long questionnaire. Thus we’re now getting offline feedback translated to online feedback. In fact, we get so much useful information from Starred that we also planned to implement the same methods to research customer experiences with shipping and contact with our customer service.

How have you implemented Starred, exactly?

It’s not in our DNA to ask customers infinite amounts of questions and to make them commit to doing anything lengthy, which is what you get with big research firms. With Starred we can ask our clients helpful questions without the whole task being colossal.

We started in our shops first, working on assembling our Net Promoter Score and assessing various touchpoints on the customer journey. As a follow up we’ve started a pilot whereby shop managers and personnel are to be trained on specific points. We gauge these elements via Starred, during and after. Through the dashboards on the Starred platform we can assess the success of these training schemes.

We also started another pilot scheme via Whatapp. Customers who had contact with our customer service received an invitation to give feedback via Whataspp. This was really successful so now we’re going to ask for feedback on our customer service across all channels.

How do you process the results internally?

We publish our results and winners monthly on our intranet, chosen on the basis of:

  • Highest NPS
  • Highest score per category

As well as announcing the winner we also share nice instances of feedback for inspiration. This ensures that everyone is immersed in the culture of exceeding customer expectations. We’ve see this at work, with shop managers logging into Starred daily to check how they’ve scored.

What were the first results?

Since we started working with Starred the NPS of our stores grew from 46 to 58. On the basis of the aforementioned training, we’re still trying to increase the NPS.

Whatsapp respondents gave our customer service an NPS of 79. The major challenge lies with the customers who gave us a 7 or 8, making them loyal - we want to get these scores up to 9s and 10s. It’s great to see that some stores are really stepping up, setting exemplary standards. Antwerp, for instance, sets the bar very high, always going the extra mile for customers.

Are there insights that wouldn’t have come to light without Starred?

We’re very self-critical and therefore assume the worst. However, the data showed that the majority of customers were simply quite satisfied - a nice confirmation. The real eye-openers came in the form of differences between branches, and between staff. During busy weekends we’ve got to be alert to customer perceptions and experiences. This has become a major focal point, thanks to the feedback from Starred.

What are the reactions from respondents regarding this way of giving feedback?

The high response rate - 40% - says a lot. We banked on 15%. It’s nice to see that clients offer tips on how we can improve. They suggest locations where we should open a shop. As the name of the member of staff is visible on the feedback form we like to share this in our teams, further motivating people. This way they can see that their efforts are appreciated.

How likely is it that you would recommend Starred to your friends or colleagues?

Very likely. Starred is an innovative tool which comes as a relief for respondents. You can see it in the responses and and the response percentages. It gives our teams a lot of impetus to improve. Starred could score a 10 when more types of analysis become possible on the collected data, so that we can form insights even quicker.


Read more customer stories:

Centralpoint

Marcel Joosten

Read more »