Here’s Why Your Account Will Be Free Forever

We’ve got big news for you. We’ve been telling you that you should focus on your Candidate Experience. It’s our business, after all. But, minor detail aside, it’s vital to the success of your company. Still don’t buy it? What if I told you that now you can now take...

The Great Rehiring: Post-Crisis Recruiting

What is the 'Great Rehiring'? We started the year 2020 fighting a ‘War for Talent’, but it’s been six months since the word ‘Coronavirus’ entered our life, turning the recruitment industry around. In fact, we’re currently experiencing a truce made of hiring freezes...

Supporting Your Employees Through the Crisis

Employee Engagement in the Time of COVID-19 Supporting your employees during this period can seem daunting, but what if you changed perspective? As Josh Bersin said in his piece COVID-19 May Be The Best Thing That Ever Happened To Employee Engagement, “Yes, it’s...

Starred & Greenhouse: the Onboarding Process

By now, you’ve probably heard of Candidate Experience and why it’s so important to start measuring it within your organization. What you might be wondering is “What does it look like to set up a Candidate Experience feedback process within my organization?” In this...

On Our Partnership With Zapier to Automate your CandE

We are proud to announce that we have partnered up with Zapier to enable our users to automate their Candidate Experience feedback process by connecting to 2000+ apps. Zapier is an online automation tool that connects your favorite apps, such as Gmail, Slack,...

On the Power of the Weekly Pulse Survey

Why is Having a Weekly Pulse Survey So Important? Not being able to see each other at the office every day can make managers feel like they don’t have control over their employees’ degree of satisfaction. Yet, the employees’ happiness and engagement should be a top...

Good Candidate Experience Practices While Remote Hiring

Good Candidate Experience shouldn’t be sacrificed in a digital environment. Remote hiring is becoming standard practice in modern businesses, and with the relevance of Candidate Experience in mind, it’s time to polish your digital etiquette. We collected a series of...

We’ve Partnered with Salesforce and Connexys

At Starred, we strongly believe in the importance of feedback. Our tool lets you improve on your People Experience, from hire to retire - integrating with your Salesforce CRM and Bullhorn Connexys ATS will certainly help you get better results in terms of Employee...

Are You Ready for Our Starred-Speakap Integration?

What is Speakap? Most organizations cannot reach and engage with their key frontline employees - those who lack a business PC, business phone, or business email address. The desk-less employees, so to say. Speakap saves the day: their app makes your internal...

Hiring Success Victory: the Road to the First Place

The Hackathon The Schedule On the 28th of August, at 9 in the morning, 14 people from our Amsterdam office sat down at the breakfast table and enjoyed croissants and fresh juice while chatting about this and that. Shortly after, they’d be introduced to their next...

Recruitment Technology: All the Tools You Need in 2020

Recruitment technology: what is it? By this term, we indicate a group of tools and platforms that can help recruiters and HR specialists in their pursuit of better results. In this article, we will list some of the best tools and platforms on the market. Those that...

Company Values: Reinforce And Celebrate Them

When a Party Means So Much More On the 18th of July at 1:50 pm, our founder reminded us of the location of our meeting.“In ten minutes sharp, we will meet on the side of the canal opposite the office!”. We were about to go on a boat ride.  Our employees enjoyed a...

Polestar: The Story of Our Design System

What Is a Design System? If you look it up in a dictionary, the definition of “design system” is quite straightforward. It's a series of elements that can be re-used in different combinations, to make it easier to manage design at scale. To make it more...

How to get the highest response rates for your feedback

Asking for feedback is crucial - once you get it, it is a very powerful tool to understand what you should improve on, and what you should avoid, in order to provide a better service to your customer base. But without enough results coming in, you can’t say anything...

Starred or Bullhorn’s Feedback Solution? A comparison.

Are you a Bullhorn user, wondering if you should opt for Bullhorn or Starred when it comes to your feedback solution? We will compare both services in detailed bullet points below. We all know our partner Bullhorn as the leading ATS for the staffing industry. However,...

Starred’s Feedback Form Page Evolution

What’s new? We recently updated the design of our feedback forms and offered our clients the option of how they want to send them - either all questions on a single page or one question per page. You can choose your preferred version in the Form Composer and try it...

How to Measure Candidate Experience

It’s already well established: bad candidate experience is costly to your business, and good CandE has excellent ROI. With poor CandE you won’t be earning precious candidate referrals, and you can expect to be spending a disproportionate amount of your time putting...

Candidate NPS Benchmarks: What Are They?

It's great to see that the NPS has moved away from being mainly a marketing instrument, transforming itself into a company-wide success metric. In recent years, Talent Acquisition has understood the great potential of leveraging Candidate NPS to represent their...

Here’s Why Your Account Will Be Free Forever

We’ve got big news for you. We’ve been telling you that you should focus on your Candidate Experience. It’s our business, after all. But, minor detail aside, it’s vital to the success of your company. Still don’t buy it? What if I told you that now you can now take...

The Great Rehiring: Post-Crisis Recruiting

What is the 'Great Rehiring'? We started the year 2020 fighting a ‘War for Talent’, but it’s been six months since the word ‘Coronavirus’ entered our life, turning the recruitment industry around. In fact, we’re currently experiencing a truce made of hiring freezes...

Good Candidate Experience Practices While Remote Hiring

Good Candidate Experience shouldn’t be sacrificed in a digital environment. Remote hiring is becoming standard practice in modern businesses, and with the relevance of Candidate Experience in mind, it’s time to polish your digital etiquette. We collected a series of...

Recruitment Technology: All the Tools You Need in 2020

Recruitment technology: what is it? By this term, we indicate a group of tools and platforms that can help recruiters and HR specialists in their pursuit of better results. In this article, we will list some of the best tools and platforms on the market. Those that...

How to get the highest response rates for your feedback

Asking for feedback is crucial - once you get it, it is a very powerful tool to understand what you should improve on, and what you should avoid, in order to provide a better service to your customer base. But without enough results coming in, you can’t say anything...

How to Measure Candidate Experience

It’s already well established: bad candidate experience is costly to your business, and good CandE has excellent ROI. With poor CandE you won’t be earning precious candidate referrals, and you can expect to be spending a disproportionate amount of your time putting...

What’s the ROI on a good Candidate Experience?

Since the ‘run for talent’ is at its all-time high, the ‘Candidate Experience’ is currently on the lips of everyone working in recruitment. According to the members of The Society for Human Resource Management, in the last decade we saw a trend towards hiring quickly...

3 Best Practices for Feedback in 2019

A new year means new years resolutions and new business goals. Why not double down and set yourself up with some healthy habits when it comes to setting your business goals as well? When setting your feedback goals and implementing feedback projects for 2019 there’s a...

How to Apply NPS to Candidate Experience

In recent years NPS has evolved from being primarily a customer/marketing metric to an expanded set of use cases: HR and recruitment are now realizing the potential of NPS as an indicator of their performance and future success. In this article I’ll discuss the...

Candidate Experience is important, but who is responsible?

When it comes to Candidate Experience, is the tide turning in the recruitment industry? It certainly seems so. Recruiters are becoming more and more concerned about measuring and improving it. The recruitment process can no longer be a black box for candidates. In the...

Candidate Experience feedback: why is it a game-changer?

As a recruiter, ensuring you have Candidate Experience feedback continuously rolling in will give you the insights necessary to continuously improve the Candidate Experience and journey. There’s no room or actual need for guesswork when it comes to considering how...

3 New Year’s Resolutions for Feedback in 2018

As we move into 2018, it’s time for making plans to get the next year off to a great start. If you’re working with feedback, you’ll already know how essential it is to know if you’re on the right track. Here are our top 3 New Year’s resolutions to make feedback a...

How Do I Calculate My Net Promoter Score?

If you're reading me in 2020, you're probably already working on improving your People Experience. That means that you're investing in your Candidate Experience and Employee Engagement. If that's the case, you've certainly heard of the NPS metric before. But what is...

Toxic Work Environments: Diagnosis and Treatment

What is a toxic work environment? Toxic work environments are a common problem. So much so that there are articles collecting inspirational quotes to equip humans worldwide with the necessary patience to survive them.  But how to define them? We could say that a toxic...

Supporting Your Employees Through the Crisis

Employee Engagement in the Time of COVID-19 Supporting your employees during this period can seem daunting, but what if you changed perspective? As Josh Bersin said in his piece COVID-19 May Be The Best Thing That Ever Happened To Employee Engagement, “Yes, it’s...

On the Power of the Weekly Pulse Survey

Why is Having a Weekly Pulse Survey So Important? Not being able to see each other at the office every day can make managers feel like they don’t have control over their employees’ degree of satisfaction. Yet, the employees’ happiness and engagement should be a top...

Are You Ready for Our Starred-Speakap Integration?

What is Speakap? Most organizations cannot reach and engage with their key frontline employees - those who lack a business PC, business phone, or business email address. The desk-less employees, so to say. Speakap saves the day: their app makes your internal...

How to get the highest response rates for your feedback

Asking for feedback is crucial - once you get it, it is a very powerful tool to understand what you should improve on, and what you should avoid, in order to provide a better service to your customer base. But without enough results coming in, you can’t say anything...

3 Best Practices for Feedback in 2019

A new year means new years resolutions and new business goals. Why not double down and set yourself up with some healthy habits when it comes to setting your business goals as well? When setting your feedback goals and implementing feedback projects for 2019 there’s a...

3 New Year’s Resolutions for Feedback in 2018

As we move into 2018, it’s time for making plans to get the next year off to a great start. If you’re working with feedback, you’ll already know how essential it is to know if you’re on the right track. Here are our top 3 New Year’s resolutions to make feedback a...

How Do I Calculate My Net Promoter Score?

If you're reading me in 2020, you're probably already working on improving your People Experience. That means that you're investing in your Candidate Experience and Employee Engagement. If that's the case, you've certainly heard of the NPS metric before. But what is...

How to get the highest response rates for your feedback

Asking for feedback is crucial - once you get it, it is a very powerful tool to understand what you should improve on, and what you should avoid, in order to provide a better service to your customer base. But without enough results coming in, you can’t say anything...

3 Best Practices for Feedback in 2019

A new year means new years resolutions and new business goals. Why not double down and set yourself up with some healthy habits when it comes to setting your business goals as well? When setting your feedback goals and implementing feedback projects for 2019 there’s a...

3 Ways to Fuel Startup Growth with Feedback

Starting up? Don’t overlook the value of early stage feedback. In this article I’ll explain 3 key reasons why metrics like Net Promoter Score and Customer Effort Score will be instrumental to your growth. Feedback is an incredibly versatile instrument in business...

The Ultimate Guide: Customer Effort Score (CES)

What is Customer Effort Score, and what is its purpose? Customer Effort Score (CES) is a customer satisfaction metric. It measures the perceived level of effort required from a customer to work with a company. Most often it’s used in scenarios to ask how much effort...

3 New Year’s Resolutions for Feedback in 2018

As we move into 2018, it’s time for making plans to get the next year off to a great start. If you’re working with feedback, you’ll already know how essential it is to know if you’re on the right track. Here are our top 3 New Year’s resolutions to make feedback a...

Evaluate Your Customer Service

For many companies, Starred is the answer to traditional, dull customer satisfaction surveys. Starred is used to collect customer feedback on a structural basis, without bothering their clients with endless questionnaires. This way, Starred functions as a constant...

The 7 Deadly Sins of Customer Satisfaction Research

Client feedback is high on the agenda for many companies. A way to collect scalable feedback is through customer satisfaction research. However, how do you make sure that it does not turn against you? By steering clear of the 7 Deadly Sins! Sin #1: Endless...

How Do I Calculate My Net Promoter Score?

If you're reading me in 2020, you're probably already working on improving your People Experience. That means that you're investing in your Candidate Experience and Employee Engagement. If that's the case, you've certainly heard of the NPS metric before. But what is...

Net Promoter Score: a Means Rather Than a Goal

Knowing the Net Promoter Score of your organization is important. It is, however, crucial to realize that it’s just an indicator not an all-decisive factor or goal in itself. After all, it doesn’t tell you why you scored the way you did. Therefore, you need to...

Checklist For the First Customer Feedback Round

Customer satisfaction survey. Sending out the first feedback batch is exciting. They are your valuable customers after all, and spamming them is the last thing you want to do. Therefore we thought we might share some tips to take away the first feedback fever. Our top...

Candidate NPS Benchmarks: What Are They?

It's great to see that the NPS has moved away from being mainly a marketing instrument, transforming itself into a company-wide success metric. In recent years, Talent Acquisition has understood the great potential of leveraging Candidate NPS to represent their...

Here’s Why Your Account Will Be Free Forever

We’ve got big news for you. We’ve been telling you that you should focus on your Candidate Experience. It’s our business, after all. But, minor detail aside, it’s vital to the success of your company. Still don’t buy it? What if I told you that now you can now take...

Starred & Greenhouse: the Onboarding Process

By now, you’ve probably heard of Candidate Experience and why it’s so important to start measuring it within your organization. What you might be wondering is “What does it look like to set up a Candidate Experience feedback process within my organization?” In this...

On Our Partnership With Zapier to Automate your CandE

We are proud to announce that we have partnered up with Zapier to enable our users to automate their Candidate Experience feedback process by connecting to 2000+ apps. Zapier is an online automation tool that connects your favorite apps, such as Gmail, Slack,...

On the Power of the Weekly Pulse Survey

Why is Having a Weekly Pulse Survey So Important? Not being able to see each other at the office every day can make managers feel like they don’t have control over their employees’ degree of satisfaction. Yet, the employees’ happiness and engagement should be a top...

We’ve Partnered with Salesforce and Connexys

At Starred, we strongly believe in the importance of feedback. Our tool lets you improve on your People Experience, from hire to retire - integrating with your Salesforce CRM and Bullhorn Connexys ATS will certainly help you get better results in terms of Employee...

Are You Ready for Our Starred-Speakap Integration?

What is Speakap? Most organizations cannot reach and engage with their key frontline employees - those who lack a business PC, business phone, or business email address. The desk-less employees, so to say. Speakap saves the day: their app makes your internal...

Polestar: The Story of Our Design System

What Is a Design System? If you look it up in a dictionary, the definition of “design system” is quite straightforward. It's a series of elements that can be re-used in different combinations, to make it easier to manage design at scale. To make it more...

Starred or Bullhorn’s Feedback Solution? A comparison.

Are you a Bullhorn user, wondering if you should opt for Bullhorn or Starred when it comes to your feedback solution? We will compare both services in detailed bullet points below. We all know our partner Bullhorn as the leading ATS for the staffing industry. However,...

Starred’s Feedback Form Page Evolution

What’s new? We recently updated the design of our feedback forms and offered our clients the option of how they want to send them - either all questions on a single page or one question per page. You can choose your preferred version in the Form Composer and try it...

What’s in an email?

What’s in an email? A lot actually. As the primary channel that our clients use to reach respondents, it’s an important part of our business.

Thoughts On Value-Driven Product Strategy

If you walk into a dark room, the first thing you do is turn the lights on. It’s an immediate reaction that we are used to doing and is generally a norm. The best way to build great products is to listen and engage with user feedback. However, although it’s considered...

In-depth: Respondent Feedback Form

Design is both art and science. In this longer read we’ve got Starred UX Designer Mac Kozal sharing his research insights and creative process from the Feedback Form redesign. The challenge. We put a quote of Ken Blanchard at the bottom of our webpage: “Feedback is...

Toxic Work Environments: Diagnosis and Treatment

What is a toxic work environment? Toxic work environments are a common problem. So much so that there are articles collecting inspirational quotes to equip humans worldwide with the necessary patience to survive them.  But how to define them? We could say that a toxic...

Hiring Success Victory: the Road to the First Place

The Hackathon The Schedule On the 28th of August, at 9 in the morning, 14 people from our Amsterdam office sat down at the breakfast table and enjoyed croissants and fresh juice while chatting about this and that. Shortly after, they’d be introduced to their next...

Company Values: Reinforce And Celebrate Them

When a Party Means So Much More On the 18th of July at 1:50 pm, our founder reminded us of the location of our meeting.“In ten minutes sharp, we will meet on the side of the canal opposite the office!”. We were about to go on a boat ride.  Our employees enjoyed a...

Candidate NPS Benchmarks: What Are They?

It's great to see that the NPS has moved away from being mainly a marketing instrument, transforming itself into a company-wide success metric. In recent years, Talent Acquisition has understood the great potential of leveraging Candidate NPS to represent their...

Here’s Why Your Account Will Be Free Forever

We’ve got big news for you. We’ve been telling you that you should focus on your Candidate Experience. It’s our business, after all. But, minor detail aside, it’s vital to the success of your company. Still don’t buy it? What if I told you that now you can now take...

The Great Rehiring: Post-Crisis Recruiting

What is the 'Great Rehiring'? We started the year 2020 fighting a ‘War for Talent’, but it’s been six months since the word ‘Coronavirus’ entered our life, turning the recruitment industry around. In fact, we’re currently experiencing a truce made of hiring freezes...

Good Candidate Experience Practices While Remote Hiring

Good Candidate Experience shouldn’t be sacrificed in a digital environment. Remote hiring is becoming standard practice in modern businesses, and with the relevance of Candidate Experience in mind, it’s time to polish your digital etiquette. We collected a series of...

Recruitment Technology: All the Tools You Need in 2020

Recruitment technology: what is it? By this term, we indicate a group of tools and platforms that can help recruiters and HR specialists in their pursuit of better results. In this article, we will list some of the best tools and platforms on the market. Those that...

How to get the highest response rates for your feedback

Asking for feedback is crucial - once you get it, it is a very powerful tool to understand what you should improve on, and what you should avoid, in order to provide a better service to your customer base. But without enough results coming in, you can’t say anything...

How to Measure Candidate Experience

It’s already well established: bad candidate experience is costly to your business, and good CandE has excellent ROI. With poor CandE you won’t be earning precious candidate referrals, and you can expect to be spending a disproportionate amount of your time putting...

What’s the ROI on a good Candidate Experience?

Since the ‘run for talent’ is at its all-time high, the ‘Candidate Experience’ is currently on the lips of everyone working in recruitment. According to the members of The Society for Human Resource Management, in the last decade we saw a trend towards hiring quickly...

3 Best Practices for Feedback in 2019

A new year means new years resolutions and new business goals. Why not double down and set yourself up with some healthy habits when it comes to setting your business goals as well? When setting your feedback goals and implementing feedback projects for 2019 there’s a...

How to Apply NPS to Candidate Experience

In recent years NPS has evolved from being primarily a customer/marketing metric to an expanded set of use cases: HR and recruitment are now realizing the potential of NPS as an indicator of their performance and future success. In this article I’ll discuss the...

Candidate Experience is important, but who is responsible?

When it comes to Candidate Experience, is the tide turning in the recruitment industry? It certainly seems so. Recruiters are becoming more and more concerned about measuring and improving it. The recruitment process can no longer be a black box for candidates. In the...

Candidate Experience feedback: why is it a game-changer?

As a recruiter, ensuring you have Candidate Experience feedback continuously rolling in will give you the insights necessary to continuously improve the Candidate Experience and journey. There’s no room or actual need for guesswork when it comes to considering how...

3 New Year’s Resolutions for Feedback in 2018

As we move into 2018, it’s time for making plans to get the next year off to a great start. If you’re working with feedback, you’ll already know how essential it is to know if you’re on the right track. Here are our top 3 New Year’s resolutions to make feedback a...

How Do I Calculate My Net Promoter Score?

If you're reading me in 2020, you're probably already working on improving your People Experience. That means that you're investing in your Candidate Experience and Employee Engagement. If that's the case, you've certainly heard of the NPS metric before. But what is...

No Results Found

The page you requested could not be found. Try refining your search, or use the navigation above to locate the post.

No Results Found

The page you requested could not be found. Try refining your search, or use the navigation above to locate the post.

Toxic Work Environments: Diagnosis and Treatment

What is a toxic work environment? Toxic work environments are a common problem. So much so that there are articles collecting inspirational quotes to equip humans worldwide with the necessary patience to survive them.  But how to define them? We could say that a toxic...

Supporting Your Employees Through the Crisis

Employee Engagement in the Time of COVID-19 Supporting your employees during this period can seem daunting, but what if you changed perspective? As Josh Bersin said in his piece COVID-19 May Be The Best Thing That Ever Happened To Employee Engagement, “Yes, it’s...

On the Power of the Weekly Pulse Survey

Why is Having a Weekly Pulse Survey So Important? Not being able to see each other at the office every day can make managers feel like they don’t have control over their employees’ degree of satisfaction. Yet, the employees’ happiness and engagement should be a top...

Are You Ready for Our Starred-Speakap Integration?

What is Speakap? Most organizations cannot reach and engage with their key frontline employees - those who lack a business PC, business phone, or business email address. The desk-less employees, so to say. Speakap saves the day: their app makes your internal...

How to get the highest response rates for your feedback

Asking for feedback is crucial - once you get it, it is a very powerful tool to understand what you should improve on, and what you should avoid, in order to provide a better service to your customer base. But without enough results coming in, you can’t say anything...

3 Best Practices for Feedback in 2019

A new year means new years resolutions and new business goals. Why not double down and set yourself up with some healthy habits when it comes to setting your business goals as well? When setting your feedback goals and implementing feedback projects for 2019 there’s a...

3 New Year’s Resolutions for Feedback in 2018

As we move into 2018, it’s time for making plans to get the next year off to a great start. If you’re working with feedback, you’ll already know how essential it is to know if you’re on the right track. Here are our top 3 New Year’s resolutions to make feedback a...

How Do I Calculate My Net Promoter Score?

If you're reading me in 2020, you're probably already working on improving your People Experience. That means that you're investing in your Candidate Experience and Employee Engagement. If that's the case, you've certainly heard of the NPS metric before. But what is...

No Results Found

The page you requested could not be found. Try refining your search, or use the navigation above to locate the post.

No Results Found

The page you requested could not be found. Try refining your search, or use the navigation above to locate the post.

Candidate NPS Benchmarks: What Are They?

It's great to see that the NPS has moved away from being mainly a marketing instrument, transforming itself into a company-wide success metric. In recent years, Talent Acquisition has understood the great potential of leveraging Candidate NPS to represent their...

Here’s Why Your Account Will Be Free Forever

We’ve got big news for you. We’ve been telling you that you should focus on your Candidate Experience. It’s our business, after all. But, minor detail aside, it’s vital to the success of your company. Still don’t buy it? What if I told you that now you can now take...

The Great Rehiring: Post-Crisis Recruiting

What is the 'Great Rehiring'? We started the year 2020 fighting a ‘War for Talent’, but it’s been six months since the word ‘Coronavirus’ entered our life, turning the recruitment industry around. In fact, we’re currently experiencing a truce made of hiring freezes...

Starred & Greenhouse: the Onboarding Process

By now, you’ve probably heard of Candidate Experience and why it’s so important to start measuring it within your organization. What you might be wondering is “What does it look like to set up a Candidate Experience feedback process within my organization?” In this...

On Our Partnership With Zapier to Automate your CandE

We are proud to announce that we have partnered up with Zapier to enable our users to automate their Candidate Experience feedback process by connecting to 2000+ apps. Zapier is an online automation tool that connects your favorite apps, such as Gmail, Slack,...

On the Power of the Weekly Pulse Survey

Why is Having a Weekly Pulse Survey So Important? Not being able to see each other at the office every day can make managers feel like they don’t have control over their employees’ degree of satisfaction. Yet, the employees’ happiness and engagement should be a top...

Good Candidate Experience Practices While Remote Hiring

Good Candidate Experience shouldn’t be sacrificed in a digital environment. Remote hiring is becoming standard practice in modern businesses, and with the relevance of Candidate Experience in mind, it’s time to polish your digital etiquette. We collected a series of...

We’ve Partnered with Salesforce and Connexys

At Starred, we strongly believe in the importance of feedback. Our tool lets you improve on your People Experience, from hire to retire - integrating with your Salesforce CRM and Bullhorn Connexys ATS will certainly help you get better results in terms of Employee...

Recruitment Technology: All the Tools You Need in 2020

Recruitment technology: what is it? By this term, we indicate a group of tools and platforms that can help recruiters and HR specialists in their pursuit of better results. In this article, we will list some of the best tools and platforms on the market. Those that...

Polestar: The Story of Our Design System

What Is a Design System? If you look it up in a dictionary, the definition of “design system” is quite straightforward. It's a series of elements that can be re-used in different combinations, to make it easier to manage design at scale. To make it more...

How to get the highest response rates for your feedback

Asking for feedback is crucial - once you get it, it is a very powerful tool to understand what you should improve on, and what you should avoid, in order to provide a better service to your customer base. But without enough results coming in, you can’t say anything...

Starred or Bullhorn’s Feedback Solution? A comparison.

Are you a Bullhorn user, wondering if you should opt for Bullhorn or Starred when it comes to your feedback solution? We will compare both services in detailed bullet points below. We all know our partner Bullhorn as the leading ATS for the staffing industry. However,...

How to Measure Candidate Experience

It’s already well established: bad candidate experience is costly to your business, and good CandE has excellent ROI. With poor CandE you won’t be earning precious candidate referrals, and you can expect to be spending a disproportionate amount of your time putting...

What’s the ROI on a good Candidate Experience?

Since the ‘run for talent’ is at its all-time high, the ‘Candidate Experience’ is currently on the lips of everyone working in recruitment. According to the members of The Society for Human Resource Management, in the last decade we saw a trend towards hiring quickly...

3 Best Practices for Feedback in 2019

A new year means new years resolutions and new business goals. Why not double down and set yourself up with some healthy habits when it comes to setting your business goals as well? When setting your feedback goals and implementing feedback projects for 2019 there’s a...

How to Apply NPS to Candidate Experience

In recent years NPS has evolved from being primarily a customer/marketing metric to an expanded set of use cases: HR and recruitment are now realizing the potential of NPS as an indicator of their performance and future success. In this article I’ll discuss the...

Candidate Experience is important, but who is responsible?

When it comes to Candidate Experience, is the tide turning in the recruitment industry? It certainly seems so. Recruiters are becoming more and more concerned about measuring and improving it. The recruitment process can no longer be a black box for candidates. In the...

What’s in an email?

What’s in an email? A lot actually. As the primary channel that our clients use to reach respondents, it’s an important part of our business.

Candidate Experience feedback: why is it a game-changer?

As a recruiter, ensuring you have Candidate Experience feedback continuously rolling in will give you the insights necessary to continuously improve the Candidate Experience and journey. There’s no room or actual need for guesswork when it comes to considering how...

Thoughts On Value-Driven Product Strategy

If you walk into a dark room, the first thing you do is turn the lights on. It’s an immediate reaction that we are used to doing and is generally a norm. The best way to build great products is to listen and engage with user feedback. However, although it’s considered...

3 New Year’s Resolutions for Feedback in 2018

As we move into 2018, it’s time for making plans to get the next year off to a great start. If you’re working with feedback, you’ll already know how essential it is to know if you’re on the right track. Here are our top 3 New Year’s resolutions to make feedback a...

How Do I Calculate My Net Promoter Score?

If you're reading me in 2020, you're probably already working on improving your People Experience. That means that you're investing in your Candidate Experience and Employee Engagement. If that's the case, you've certainly heard of the NPS metric before. But what is...

No Results Found

The page you requested could not be found. Try refining your search, or use the navigation above to locate the post.

Here’s Why Your Account Will Be Free Forever

We’ve got big news for you. We’ve been telling you that you should focus on your Candidate Experience. It’s our business, after all. But, minor detail aside, it’s vital to the success of your company. Still don’t buy it? What if I told you that now you can now take...

On Our Partnership With Zapier to Automate your CandE

We are proud to announce that we have partnered up with Zapier to enable our users to automate their Candidate Experience feedback process by connecting to 2000+ apps. Zapier is an online automation tool that connects your favorite apps, such as Gmail, Slack,...

In-depth: Respondent Feedback Form

Design is both art and science. In this longer read we’ve got Starred UX Designer Mac Kozal sharing his research insights and creative process from the Feedback Form redesign. The challenge. We put a quote of Ken Blanchard at the bottom of our webpage: “Feedback is...

Candidate NPS Benchmarks: What Are They?

It's great to see that the NPS has moved away from being mainly a marketing instrument, transforming itself into a company-wide success metric. In recent years, Talent Acquisition has understood the great potential of leveraging Candidate NPS to represent their...

Here’s Why Your Account Will Be Free Forever

We’ve got big news for you. We’ve been telling you that you should focus on your Candidate Experience. It’s our business, after all. But, minor detail aside, it’s vital to the success of your company. Still don’t buy it? What if I told you that now you can now take...

Starred & Greenhouse: the Onboarding Process

By now, you’ve probably heard of Candidate Experience and why it’s so important to start measuring it within your organization. What you might be wondering is “What does it look like to set up a Candidate Experience feedback process within my organization?” In this...

On Our Partnership With Zapier to Automate your CandE

We are proud to announce that we have partnered up with Zapier to enable our users to automate their Candidate Experience feedback process by connecting to 2000+ apps. Zapier is an online automation tool that connects your favorite apps, such as Gmail, Slack,...

On the Power of the Weekly Pulse Survey

Why is Having a Weekly Pulse Survey So Important? Not being able to see each other at the office every day can make managers feel like they don’t have control over their employees’ degree of satisfaction. Yet, the employees’ happiness and engagement should be a top...

We’ve Partnered with Salesforce and Connexys

At Starred, we strongly believe in the importance of feedback. Our tool lets you improve on your People Experience, from hire to retire - integrating with your Salesforce CRM and Bullhorn Connexys ATS will certainly help you get better results in terms of Employee...

Polestar: The Story of Our Design System

What Is a Design System? If you look it up in a dictionary, the definition of “design system” is quite straightforward. It's a series of elements that can be re-used in different combinations, to make it easier to manage design at scale. To make it more...

Starred or Bullhorn’s Feedback Solution? A comparison.

Are you a Bullhorn user, wondering if you should opt for Bullhorn or Starred when it comes to your feedback solution? We will compare both services in detailed bullet points below. We all know our partner Bullhorn as the leading ATS for the staffing industry. However,...

What’s in an email?

What’s in an email? A lot actually. As the primary channel that our clients use to reach respondents, it’s an important part of our business.

Thoughts On Value-Driven Product Strategy

If you walk into a dark room, the first thing you do is turn the lights on. It’s an immediate reaction that we are used to doing and is generally a norm. The best way to build great products is to listen and engage with user feedback. However, although it’s considered...

Starred’s Feedback Form Page Evolution

What’s new?

We recently updated the design of our feedback forms and offered our clients the option of how they want to send them – either all questions on a single page or one question per page. You can choose your preferred version in the Form Composer and try it out.

You can find the option to choose Feedback Form type in the top bar of Feedback Composer

We decided to offer two versions to our clients after performing multiple intensive studies and user testing.

Left: Feedback form displayed as one question per page
Right: Feedback form displayed as all questions on one page

The evolution

The first version of the Starred Feedback Form is a couple of years old.  Last year we started working on several improvements. Our ambition was to make it fast and fun for respondents to give feedback, be it on any device, in any country, and in any context. It was a demanding challenge. We set up 3 design rules that we respected at every step of the process:

  • Putting the respondent first
  • Building on knowledge, not assumptions
  • Granting easy access on any device

We wanted to provide gratifying, unobtrusive, responsive, fun, and accessible experiences through giving feedback.  The Feedback Form 2.0 was our answer.

We tested it for several months with a group of clients and learned a lot about how respondents are using it.  We noticed that the new version performs better in a matter of answered questions and respondents leave on average 22% more comments (which represent incredibly valuable qualitative data to our clients).

Confident with the test results, we decided to rewrite the new feedback form in super fast React technology and make it freely accessible to users.   

One question per page Feedback Form on a tablet

When we dug into the data, we observed that the one question per page design works better with the shorter forms. With the 3+ question blocks, the number of given answers decreased. We were determined to do something about that.

One question per page: The percentage of answered question dropped when the form is longer than 3 question blocks

We know that many of our clients like the original feedback form layout. One of Starred’s promises has been to deliver surveys which fit on one single page. The respondents can overview the whole form and skip questions they don’t want to answer.  

After many discussions and studies, we concluded that the best way would have been to tweak our original form, other than providing a new one.  

To verify our assumptions, we asked our clients which idea and approach they liked the most. The most votes were for the version with one question per page, but the second most popular opinion was to upgrade the existing feedback form.

The second most popular opinion in our preference test among clients was to continue working on improvements of existing feedback form
Some opinions of users who voted for multiple questions per page

We did various studies and tested a number of hypotheses in order to find a satisfactory solution. We examined many UI patterns to choose those that work the best and are pleasing for respondents.

We did multiple tests and formulated a few design hypotheses before we started the redesign process
We checked a lot of UI patterns to find the one that works the best
The original form vs. updated version. More prominent elements and more delightful graphics improve the general user experience for respondents. Visible comments icons boost the number of given comments. We decided to get rid of elements that distract respondents, like the partial score and make the elements that personalize experience more dominant – bigger avatar and a welcome note. Clients can also adjust the accent color of the elements
The final set of card components used in a new feedback form. We keep all fonts and paddings in the same relations to create cohesive, calm, and pleasant experiences.

Benefits for the clients

The new versions of the feedback forms have many advantages for our clients. They help them collect feedback and reach their business goals.

  • A higher completion rate. The total completion rate is almost 100% better on the new feedback forms’ versions
The completion rate of original feedback form vs. a new one
  • More comments. Respondents tend to leave 22% more comments on the new feedback form page
  • Speed. New versions open noticeably faster than the original one
Speed index [s] – 3G speed,  methodology: https://sites.google.com/a/webpagetest.org/docs/using-webpagetest/metrics/speed-index
  • Various UX improvements and increased readability on all screen sizes. We put extra effort into mobile devices. 63% of our feedback forms are opened on phones and tablets.  We improved the interactive elements; right now, they are fully adjusted for mobile interactions
  • Respondents spend slightly more time on new feedback form pages. The average time increased from 2 minutes to 2.1 minutes

Conclusion

We are very proud of the new forms’ designs. We have tested them thoroughly and with great results.
As for the version with all the questions on a single page, it works better with longer and more complex forms. The design with one question per page is a better choice for survey with no more than 3 questions.
We hope you will quickly adopt the new forms and cannot wait to hear your feedback!

This is How You Should Measure Your Recruiters’ Performance

Whether you work for a recruitment agency or a talent acquisition team, you might sometimes find yourself drowning in metrics. From cost-per-hire to cNPS, there is no end to the measures that nowadays companies can take to better their performance.

But are those efforts sufficient? Are they efficient?
Is there no better-organized system to promote positive change for your agency or business unit?

A good recruiter is one with positive financial metrics, happy candidates and happy hiring managers. So these are the areas we will have to investigate when measuring recruiter performance.

Let’s start by trying to answer the first question: is your recruitment-performance measuring system sufficient?

Mostly, recruitment agencies and stakeholders depend on financial measures to track recruiter performance. Unfortunately, these can’t account for how the candidates or hiring managers feel about their experience with the recruiter. What are the consequences?

Bad Candidate Experience with recruiters damages your brand and costs you valuable customers

As you might know, Candidate Experience (or CX) is more and more of a hot subject nowadays. But why is it so important?
Poor Candidate Experience has first- and second-hand consequences.
The first-hand consequences only impact the unhappy candidate, who, most probably, will ghost you.

The second-hand consequences imply that the candidate has spread the word about his poor experience with you through negative reviews. The consequences can be that you will get lower quality candidates, more time will be needed to fill your vacancies and, finally, you can suffer financial loss due to their boycotting.

If you’re curious about how much money your business might be losing because of poor Candidate Experience, you can use our Candidate Experience cost estimator.

In this paragraph, we will focus on the second-hand consequences of a poor CX, which usually have a way bigger impact on your business.

In times when word of mouth is facilitated by social media, it’s time for the recruitment industry to lend an ear to the job applicants’ opinions, in order to avoid the dire consequences we briefly mentioned above.

As mentioned in Social Talent’s article Candidate Experience & The Application Process: 4 Things You’re Doing Wrong, 22% of the unhappy candidates actively tell others not to work for the company that disappointed them.
You might think that it’s just another drop in the ocean, but a Glassdoor report states that around 70% of the candidates are using job search websites to read reviews of a company before submitting an application.

Poor reviews drive away high-quality candidates and lengthen the time needed to successfully fill a position, thus increasing recruiting costs. Finally, some candidates will stop buying a company’s products if their application experience was negative. This is especially true of commodities, which are consumed often and can be easily replaced.

If you’re curious, you can read of how Bad Candidate Experience Cost Virgin Media $5M Annually – Here Is How They Turned That Around. In their case, 18% of rejected candidates were also Virgin Media customers, and 2 out of 3 candidates were likely not to recommend Virgin Media to others.

Social Talent’s previously mentioned article also shows us that after a negative experience, 42% of the candidates said they would never seek employment at that company again.
As mentioned in SmartRecruiters’ eBook How to Create Hiring Success, 50% of the candidates said they would not purchase products and services from that company!

Now we understand it’s important not just to focus on financial metrics. Candidate experience is important – but what defines it as bad?

The article Candidate Experience: All the Stats, Facts and Data You’ll Ever Need to Know reads: “76% of people say that not hearing back from an employer after a job interview is more frustrating than not hearing from someone after a first date”.

Other issues could appear if, for example, you provided the candidates with vague or redundant information about the job, the application process was too long or complex or your communication was not transparent.

Poor experiences shape the applicant’s attitude towards a company and are hard to measure until they reveal themselves on social media platforms in the form of negative reviews. If it is indeed subjective and difficult to quantify, then how do we measure it?

You should measure your performance through Candidate NPS, or cNPS. Why? Recruiters are usually the first point of human interaction with an applicant during the candidate journey. This means that they become the face of the company for that particular job-seeker.

It is important for recruiters to maintain an attitude that represents the company and its values, just as it is important for the candidates to have a clear image of the business whose vacancy they’re applying for.
Bad candidate experience can start with the recruiter and lead to an increase in the number of detractors and to negative reviews online.

For a deeper dive into the subject of cNPS, you can read the article How to Apply NPS to Candidate Experience.
For now, it suffices for you to know that candidate NPS is like a thermometer: it lets you understand how satisfied your candidates are with your performance so that you can ask yourself why and improve.

In the next paragraph, we will discuss the first-hand consequences of Candidate Experience. If the application process is too long, the communication faulty or the job poorly described, most probably your candidates will ghost you.

Ghosting is a real problem, and it reflects on your cNPS

Recruiters used to disappear and never get in touch with candidates, but now the tables are turning.
There is nothing fun about filling out a complex application for one of your vacancies, only to wonder if the application actually went through. Chances are, your candidates will eventually give up on their dreams of working for you and move on to a better opportunity.
But this is not all – beware, ghosts can re-emerge on review sites.

This converts your biggest supporters into detractors, worsening your cNPS score.

Candidate ghosting increases the time it takes to successfully fill a position. It also reduces the number of high-quality candidate referrals.
Terrible, isn’t it? It feels even worse if the ghosting is due to an out-sourced recruiter you hired…

Now that we’ve mentioned the widespread use of financial metrics and added the element of candidate experience, it is time to focus on your hiring managers.

But what about your hiring managers?

We learned that a happy candidate means a happy advocate, but your hiring manager’s satisfaction is crucial too. As we previously mentioned, a good recruiter is one with good financial metrics, happy candidates that buy your products and speak kind words, and happy hiring managers that keep their collaboration with you alive.

Bad hires cost the company lots of time and money. This is especially true for extremely technical or high-level positions. Job applicants should be well-suited for the company and adequately prepared for the application process.

One way to ensure the recruiter isn’t just pushing as many candidates through the system as possible is to check if the hiring manager is happy with the provided selection of candidates. If feedback from your hiring manager comes back as generally negative, then you know your problem is generated before the hiring manager.

The metrics that your hiring managers will calculate to see if they’re happy are the ones concerning the quality of hire. Around this subject, Harver has written a very exhaustive article: “Measuring Quality of Hire – All You Need to Know”.

In the section regarding how to gather data to improve your performance, 4 options are mentioned:

  • Hiring Manager Satisfaction Surveys
  • Employee Engagement Surveys
  • Feedback on the Hiring Process
  • New Hire Performance Metrics

Measuring recruiter performance is more than just tracking financial KPIs during the process. The human element is very important to capture, as it is an integral part of the journey. Numbers are not the only thing you should be worrying about. Recruiters remain one of the first points of human contact for a company.

With all these elements to consider, no KPI by itself is sufficient to tell you how your recruiters are performing. Is your measuring system efficient?

There is no cure-all KPI

Candidates generally don’t care about how long it takes to fill a slot in a different department, or how much that costs the company per quarter. Instead, they want respectful interactions with a recruiter and their candidate journey to be handled properly.

Questions asked to candidates about these interactions, paired with hard-line measures about the recruiting process, help you establish realistic benchmarks that can help you optimize your CX process.

You also need to listen to your hiring managers’ opinions – if they are negative, you need to find fast ways to provide them with better candidates that are a more suitable fit for their vacancies.

It is necessary to keep on measuring financial metrics, too. Some examples can be acquisition cost or sourcing-channel cost.

You will need to consider multiple KPIs at the same time, in order to improve. What to prioritize, then? A chaotic system is an inefficient one.
Having an organized view would help you be more efficient.
The next paragraph will showcase our recommendations.

What do we recommend?

At the beginning of this article, we asked ourselves if your recruitment-performance measuring method was sufficient, efficient and organized.
One by one, we answered those questions. Your system cannot be sufficient unless you consider the 3 elements needed to make a good recruiter: positive financial metrics, happy candidates and happy hiring managers.

We then saw how inefficient and disorganized it can become, once you have to consider several KPIs at the same time, with no clear prioritization system. Dashboarding would help you visualize all relevant information at the glimpse of an eye. But that would not help your recruiters improve, per se.

We have found a way to help your recruiters improve: you can fuel positive competition amongst them while giving the hard workers the recognition they deserve.

Our Recruitment Matrix will allow you to compare your recruiters’ performance based on a set of metrics that are relevant to your business.
This will provide you with a ranking of your best-performing employees and will let them understand what to improve on, to increase their positioning.

It allows you to identify the issues within your team or agency in a quick and easy way, therefore simplifying your managerial tasks, therefore proving to be sufficient, efficient, organized and convenient, too.


Do you want to know more about this?
Do not hesitate to reach out, we will be happy to assist you in your decision.

Phil Brown
phil@starred.com

Candidate Experience: Stats, Facts, and Data You Need to Know

Did you know? 76% of people say that not hearing back from an employer after a job interview is more frustrating than not hearing from someone after a first date.

If you’re in HR or Recruitment, you know that Candidate Experience (or CandE) is vital. If you leave candidates reeling from bad experiences with you, it will result in social media amplification. Furthermore, this candidate will not be referring any more candidates to you.

If you’re a consumer brand they’re dramatically less likely to ever buy from you again. Bad Candidate Experience means you’re leaving money on the table, and you’re opening yourself up to Glassdoor wildfires.

Don’t just take my word for it.

In this article, I’ve broken down some of the most vital Candidate Experience stats and facts.

Unhappy candidates make for unhappy customers. Candidates do not feel heard, and a shocking amount of candidates feel like they’re not respected.

Unhappy candidates make unhappy customers

  • 50% of candidates won’t buy from or recommend a company after a bad recruitment experience
  • 39% of dissatisfied candidates will never do business with that company again. 65% of those with a positive experience say they will do business although they were never hired
  • 34% of candidates with a bad candidate experience will share it online

 Candidates do not feel heard

  • 35,6% of companies admit to never surveying candidates about their experience ever, compared to 18% in 2016
  • Only 8.9% of companies survey candidates at every possible touchpoint, compared to 11,5% in 2016
  • Only 25% of candidates were asked to provide feedback about their experience prior to the starting date

 Candidates do not feel respected

  • 46% of candidates believed their time was disrespected during interviews
  • 47% of job seekers did not complete a job application because it was “too lengthy or complicated.”
  • 43% of candidates spend 30 minutes or more on the average online application, and 10% invest in it an hour or more.
  • 25% of candidates receive no preparation at all before their interview
  • 59% of candidates admitted to having left job applications because of technical issues (bugs, bad website, or even bad design). (The Hiring Process Unveiled, ICIMS)
  • 52% of candidates have to wait for 3 months or more on a response

What’s driving bad candidate experience?

Looking through these stats a clear picture emerges.

The process and experience that organizations deliver aren’t one they’d love to experience. This explains the current drivers of bad candidate experience being as they are.

Say what you want about ‘empathy’ as a business strategy, but when you don’t put yourself in your candidate’s shoes it shouldn’t be a surprise to hear that close to half of candidates feel their time is disrespected in interviews.

Food for thought

These Candidate Experience stats, facts, and data probably struck you as surprising. They are, indeed, impressive, especially to those who were not convinced about the relevance of CandE.

Now all that remains is to take action to improve your Candidate Experience.

🍟 Put yourself in your candidates’ shoes.

Would you fill out a lengthy, and buggy application? Would you be happy with an unclear process and lack of communication?

🍕Make feedback a two-way street.

Give your candidates feedback about their progress but ask them for feedback and make them feel heard.

🍔 Start with the human.

Listen and respect your candidates. These stats do not translate to every recruitment business, but listening to your candidates will at least identify your pitfalls.




Serious about improving your Candidate Experience?

We’re already working on Candidate Experience at the likes of Danone, as well as successful recruiters like Altus Staffing. It’s all about automated and actionable feedback. Measure Candidates Experience and improve it. We’ll show you how.

Reach out and let’s discuss your challenges.

Candidate NPS Benchmarks: What Are They?

It’s great to see that the NPS has moved away from being mainly a marketing instrument, transforming itself into a company-wide success metric. In recent years, Talent Acquisition has understood the great potential of leveraging Candidate NPS to represent their performance and predict their future hiring success.

Starred is a feedback solution focused on measuring Candidate Experience. Every year, several hundred-thousands surveys are sent to candidates across the globe in order to understand their experience with the company they applied for. If you’d like a quick refresher on the Candidate Net Promoter Score, have a go at Mark Berendsen’s article.
We allow all our users to benchmark their Candidate NPS, not only against their different departments, recruiters, countries, and more – but also against the market.

We have recently opened a part of our solution for free, which allows all organizations to measure the Candidate Experience of their job applicants that have been rejected after an interview. If you, dear reader, want to understand how you treat the candidates that you’ve rejected after an interview and compare yourself to other companies, you can easily open a free Starred account.

In this article, I will discuss all the different moments in a candidate’s journey and present the Candidate Net Promoter Score Benchmarks per stage. Be aware that this article has been written in July 2020. If you want a benchmark that’s more up-to-date, follow the link to open your free Starred account.

Let’s dive right into the Candidate NPS benchmarks

If you are impatient and just want to see the results, you can scroll down: you will find all you need below. But, before that, I’d like to clarify why we’re separating candidates in different stages and different types. To get a more thorough understanding of your recruitment process and the sentiment of the different candidates, we have to take some things into account. For example, what you want to avoid are biased answers and survey fatigue. Biased answers happen when the feedback that’s given does not reflect the actual experience of the candidate – survey fatigue happens when a person receives too many surveys that it starts to become annoying. Therefore, we argue that you should only survey the candidates that have left your recruitment funnel. Imagine this: a candidate is still in the race for a position, and they receive a survey invitation. What we see is that these candidates often give positive feedback because they think it might help them show a positive relation to the company.
We advise you to first approach all the rejected candidates on the stages up until hired, next take the hired candidates, and finally address those who have withdrawn their application. This also aids with the problem of survey fatigue. Candidates don’t want to receive a survey after every stage, interview, assessment, or phone screen. Send them a single survey with questions related to, or up to, the moment in which they left the funnel.

And yes, this will mean that for the stages where you only measure the experience of rejected candidates, you will see a lower Candidate NPS. However, this reflects their true experience. It will give you more insights and data on what kind of improvements you can make. Moreover, every other company you benchmark yourself against does the same. This is why it is crucial to separate the different candidates and use different Candidate Net Promoter Scores across the candidate journey to get the clearest picture of your performance on key stages. Some companies deliver great experiences to the people they have given an offer to but are underperforming for the ones rejected after a phone screening.
Let’s take a look at the current global Candidate NPS benchmark:

Candidates rejected after application: – 20

Candidates rejected after assessment: – 5

Candidates rejected after interview: – 4

Withdrawn Candidates: + 18

Hired candidates: + 60

Onboarding: + 37

Hiring Manager: + 16

The touchpoint “Rejected after Application” presents the lowest score of all: -20. We then see “Rejected after assessment”, with a higher score: -5. “Rejected after an interview” scored -4. The candidates who withdrew show a more generous score: +18. Candidates that have been onboarded score a Candidate NPS of +37 whereas the hiring manager experience scores a +16. Finally, hired candidates reach +60.

Analyzing the Candidate Net Promoter Score benchmark results

While looking at the overall results, most conclusions are intuitive.

It is, in fact, to be expected that rejected candidates will give lower scores when compared to those who withdrew from the hiring process, or the ones who were hired.

The candidates who had to go through the assessment and did not pass are generally happier than those who were rejected after the CV screening. Those candidates who have been rejected after an interview show an even higher score. Why?

When candidates are rejected earlier in the funnel, their scores are lower because the rejection messages sent out at an early stage are often automated, containing ‘standardized’ rejection reasons, and, therefore, feel impersonal. Moreover, candidates might have the feeling they weren’t able to show their true potential. This negatively affects these candidates’ experience, as reflected by this touchpoint’s score. Candidates that have been rejected after a CV screen are often asked about the process itself. How easy it was to apply? How quickly did the company reply? Was the reason for rejection made clear? And other relevant questions.

When a candidate has been rejected after the interview stage, the candidate has been in contact with the company’s recruitment team and hiring managers. These rejections are handled more personally. The constructive feedback about the candidate’s performance in the process and prospects in the company that often goes along with them are valued and result in a higher Candidate NPS. However, there is still a long way to go. Feedback often shows room for improvements in topics like interview preparation, feedback after interview, timeliness, and professionalism of the recruiter and/or interviewer.

Next steps to start improving Candidate Experience

In Starred, the above-mentioned benchmarks are automatically part of your account. You will be able to segment benchmarks on geographical location, and we’re working on diving deeper into other segments such as industry, ATS, and demographic elements. As previously indicated, you can create a free Starred account and use it to measure and benchmark yourself on the interview stage.

Toxic Work Environments: Diagnosis and Treatment

What is a toxic work environment?

Toxic work environments are a common problem. So much so that there are articles collecting inspirational quotes to equip humans worldwide with the necessary patience to survive them. 

But how to define them? We could say that a toxic environment is “one wherein dysfunction and drama reign”. It can be the result of a variety of causes, such as toxic employees, absence of order, or weaponized cultural values.

What can toxicity lead to?

This kind of toxicity can impact one’s morale, performance, physical, and mental health.

“When a workplace becomes toxic, its poison spreads beyond its walls and into the lives of its workers and their families.”, wrote Gary Chapman in Rising Above a Toxic Workplace.

In the same book, Paul White shared that “health problems stemming from workplace stress include hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and decreased mental health, and can lead to fatal conditions, recent research from Stanford and Harvard Universities found.”

Toxicity also has a dire impact on your business: 38% of employees say they decrease the quality of their work in a toxic work environment, 25% say they have taken their frustration out on customers, and 12% have simply left their jobs as a result of a toxic workplace.
It is, therefore, vital for you to fight it, but you can’t fight what you can’t see.
If toxicity in the workplace is a disease, what are its symptoms? What are its causes? And what are the most efficient cures for it?

Gary Chapman’s words on toxic work environments

What are the symptoms of a toxic work environment?

To mention some tell-tale signs, the toxicity of a work environment can manifest itself through:

  • A culture of overwork
  • Vertical and/or horizontal bullying 
  • Poor communication
  • Generalized poor behavior, seen in both bosses and employees
  • Abundant office drama
  • Gossip
  • General dysfunction
  • Managerial tyranny 
  • Lack of career growth for the workforce
  • Lack of opportunities for all or part of minorities 
  • High levels of stress
  • Management’s lax responses to issues

The article “10 Signs You’re in a Toxic Work Environment – and How to Escape” provides you a deeper dive into some of these symptoms. 
The reasons for toxicity are mainly three. If we’re looking at a company as a whole, we can accuse a corrupt culture. If we take a closer look, at the team level, we can notice the consequences of poor leadership. And finally, harmful employees can be part of the equation. Let’s analyze them one by one, in correlation with the symptoms they trigger. 

The first cause of toxic work environments: a corrupt culture

“If you go to strong-cultured environments, chances are that they’re going to have cultural values that are very meaningful to them. Often. […] A toxic environment is when you see that those cultural values are being weaponized, that they’re being used selfishly as opposed to nobly.” That’s what Professor Frances Frei told us when we interviewed her. 

Sadly, as it turns out, even the most beautiful value can be weaponized. As the Harvard Business School Professor mentioned, this is even touching the value of meritocracy – one that can make anyone’s heart sing – as it’s currently being weaponized in many fast-growing work environments. It’s being used to justify the status quo in businesses where only a thin slice of the pie of demographics is rewarded with the possibility of having a successful career.

That being said, you can also tell that your company’s culture is corrupt if you go into a meeting and see that those who are speaking and those who aren’t are part of distinct demographic patterns. In a few words, integration is lacking. “If a black working mom has as good a chance of thriving in your organization as anyone else, then you’re getting a whole bunch of things right.”, writes Professor Frei.

What can you do if you acknowledge the weaponization of cultural values inside your organization? The treatment is simple: you let them go and re-do them. After trying to bring weaponized values back and insisting on re-explaining them, Professor Frei realized that it’s an impossible feat. Once it’s corrupt, even the most inspiring of values is gone. When it’s time to rewrite them, Professor Frei advised us to “Let them come up from the entire organization.”. Anyone who wants to co-author cultural values should be able to contribute.

Now that we’ve explored the corruption of cultural values, we ask ourselves: what happens when integration is missing? How can you cure this toxic issue within your organization?

Correcting it demands immediate action. No aspect of diversity should necessarily be prioritized, but you should try and tackle as many as you can, as soon as possible. This way, you’ll avoid stalling, which is often a powerful tool against fostering true inclusion.

The second cause of toxic work environments: poor leadership 

The negative energy coming from certain individuals can ruin the healthy atmosphere enjoyed by the rest of the collective and impact the team’s performance. 

Whereas it is possible to avoid negative people in our personal lives, the workplace makes it inevitable at times for you or your employees to have contact with those harmful individuals. 

Now that we’ve seen the two most common symptoms of toxicity inside an organization let’s raise our magnifying lens and take a closer look at what poor management can do. What does a dysfunctional team-leader look like? 

When the head of a team has no idea how to lead, the consequences can be pretty grim.
Think about this: a Randstad study confirms that 60% of employees surveyed left or were considering leaving a job because of their direct supervisor.

Usually, leadership is poor when the boss thinks it’s all about them. This can make them mistrusting, anxious, and sometimes even tyrannical.

Micromanagement and overwork can become the new norm for your team, and a toxic boss often doesn’t take responsibility for their mistakes either.
Poor leadership can translate into a variety of profiles: the Career Contessa piece “I hate my boss” compiled a list of 7 major ‘bad boss’ personas.

The problem seems to be more common than one would expect, especially considering what has come out of the woodwork during the current crisis, which has seen the “Bossware” industry booming.

What’s the treatment in such a situation? Toxic bosses are often incapable of taking feedback, whether it is top-down or bottom-up. If your boss is the toxic kind, it might be worth it to attempt an honest conversation. Or two. Or three. It could mark the beginning of a healthy dialogue. 

You could also reach out to the HR department and make them aware of your suffering. Having a support group involving colleagues with similar experiences could bring the attention of the Human Resources department to you quicker. They might suggest some counseling or seminars for the bad bosses to attend, or even realize that there’s no space for unreformed tyrants in their organization.

I’ve so far ignored the possibility that, while reading this, you’ve asked yourself, “Do I fit the description of the bad boss?”. If that’s what’s happening, ask yourself this: what is your goal as a leader?
If the answer has to do more with you than with empowering those around you, then you might be on the wrong track.

The third cause of toxic work environments: harmful employees

If you watched our interview with Atta Tarki, you’d remember how he shared with us the importance of hiring top-notch talent. It might, therefore, be surprising for you to hear this, but, according to a Harvard Business Review study, avoiding hiring a toxic employee is more vital than getting star talent to join your business. In fact, “avoiding a toxic worker was worth about $12,500 in turnover costs, but even the top 1% of superstar employees only added about $5,300 to the bottom line.”

How can you identify toxic individuals in the workplace? 

The piece Toxicity in the Team: How to Recognize and Defuse, identifies four different types of toxic employees. 

Power-thirsty vampires

Let’s start off with Power Vampires. Vampires are so common in the workplace that they’re part of pop culture by now, immortalized by two characters in the hilarious HBO show What We Do in the Shadows: an Energy Vampire, and an Emotional Vampire.
How do you identify a Power Vampire? It’s quite simple. Don’t waste your time looking for fangs and capes, but know that their pessimism is strong enough to “drag everyone into an endless whirlwind of failure and bad mood.” Sometimes their energy is so strong that you can feel the grey cloud of disappointment and frustration before you’re visually aware that they’ve entered the room. For every solution, ten more problems arise: they need an excuse to complain incessantly. Naturally, their feedback is never constructive.
Why are these people dangerous to your organization? Simply put, their negativity is contagious and can end up suppressing your employees’ motivation to perform. Even the more persistent positivity can be crushed by their neverending comparisons with the competition and bleak perspective on things. 

The best cure

Your employees’ state of mind needs to be protected from overflowing negativity at all costs, but coaching sessions won’t solve your problems either. All you can do is talk to these employees and try and understand if there are driving factors under your control. Can their outlook and behavior be fixed? If not, you might have to let them go, for the sake of the business.

The spilled tea

You’ll hear them before you see them. These individuals spend most of their time sharing unpleasant thoughts or remarks concerning their colleagues.
It’s been shown that we see in others the flaws and qualities that we recognize as intrinsically ours. Based on this assumption, these people’s negativity possibly comes from a place of poor self-esteem and dissatisfaction with their lives. The gossip distracts the attention of their colleagues from themselves, to make it fall on a coworker’s personal life. 

The best cure

This type of gossipy behavior affects Loquacious Larry’s and Chatty Cathy’s performance and that of those around them. It also negatively affects the office atmosphere, dragging in tension and possible frictions.
Gossipers might be successfully coached, and need to be reminded that, if there was a time for such narcissistic activities, it is certainly not during working hours. 

Nobody likes a know-it-all

Control Freaks are champions of micro-management and detail obsession. They only rely on themselves and never miss a chance to remind the rest of the team how much better they are at their job. They have the additional tendency to ignore their teammates’ right to have ideas and express them.
Clearly, this attitude can be detrimental to teams. 

The best cure

Sometimes a clearer division of responsibility inside the team can help, but, sadly, this character line cannot be corrected. It’s necessary to inform their superior or the manager of the HR department. 

Fishing for compliments

Some people are highly dependent on praise. Validation addicts only see their worth through someone else’s words, and when those don’t come, they can feel like their efforts haven’t been sufficiently noticed nor their merits recognized. Whenever that happens, they might feel demotivated, which negatively impacts the workflow, and could even resort to sabotaging the process. 

The best cure

The best thing that you can do in this situation is to help them understand that their team is their support system and not their competition, all while working on extirpating their insecurity.

Too long; didn’t read (TL;DR)

Toxicity in the workplace is, sadly, a very common phenomenon. In this article, we explored the three main root causes of it: a corrupt culture, poor leadership, and harmful employees. 

A corrupt culture can show these two symptoms: the weaponization of cultural values, or a lack of integration within the company. The solution for the first issue is to replace the affected values, whereas, for the second, it’s recommended to tackle integration as soon as possible.

When it comes to poor leadership, there are several ways for it to affect the office environment: a culture of overwork, micro-management, tyrannical behavior. Usually, bad bosses have a hard time taking feedback the right way, but the HR department can and should help you out. And if you are a boss yourself and you’re questioning your worth, you’re probably doing alright as long as your goal is to empower and unleash those around you. 

Finally, there are four major types of harmful employees: the Power Vampires, the Gossipers, the Know-it-alls, and the Validation Addicts. Some of these categories are, unfortunately, impossible to reform, but there are cases in which, for instance, the fourth category, consisting of insecure employees, can make huge progress. 

As much as toxic work environments are a common issue, that doesn’t make it any less vital for you to eradicate the issue. The stress that such workplaces cause can affect your employees’ personal and professional lives to a high degree. Hopefully, this read gave you some useful tools to identify and solve the problem.

If you want to dive deeper into how to support your workforce better, we recommend for you to read Supporting Your Employees Through the Crisis. It might help you utilize this phase to transform your organization for the best. 

Here’s Why Your Account Will Be Free Forever

We’ve got big news for you. We’ve been telling you that you should focus on your Candidate Experience. It’s our business, after all. But, minor detail aside, it’s vital to the success of your company. Still don’t buy it? What if I told you that now you can now take care of it for free?
Yes, you read that right. 

Let us tell you the story of why we came to this decision.

First of all, what is Candidate Experience? In our Ultimate Guide to Candidate Experience Feedback, we’d defined it as the result of all the interactions your job applicants have with you during their journey. 

It was back in 2018 that we truly understood that it was time to redirect our focus towards Candidate Experience. It had become clear that businesses were missing data and insights when it came to their applicants’ experience, and had, therefore, underinvested. 

Over time we started seeing big corporations and scale-ups prioritizing it more and more, and we thought they’d be the only true users of our feedback solution, as they hire at scale. 

Fast-forward to June 2020. That’s when we realized that the issue of poor Candidate Experience affects companies of all sizes and industries. At the moment of our realization, the market wasn’t yet offering a highly specialized feedback solution fit for tighter pockets – especially not one including benchmark data, and our structure wasn’t ideal to suit every company’s needs.

We decided to change that.

We now allow you to set up a Starred account which will be forever free of charge. If you were wondering whether or not you should invest in your candidates’ satisfaction, now’s the time. 

What is it that you would get in your free Starred account? We’re all for clarity, so let us explain what you can expect below.

  • Your account will be free for eternity
  • Your company will get an unlimited amount of users
  • You will also get unlimited survey invites. You can send as many surveys as you want, no big deal
  • You can measure one touch-point of your candidate journey: ‘Rejected After Interview’, which will provide you with very rich feedback  
  • You have access to one survey template, which is related to the ‘Rejected After Interview’ touch-point

Using a feedback solution will amplify your job applicants’ voices and make you aware of what improves their experience, as well as what dissatisfies them. 

Start taking control of your Candidate Experience.

 

The Great Rehiring: Post-Crisis Recruiting

What is the ‘Great Rehiring’?

We started the year 2020 fighting a ‘War for Talent’, but it’s been six months since the word ‘Coronavirus’ entered our life, turning the recruitment industry around. In fact, we’re currently experiencing a truce made of hiring freezes and furloughs.
The first months of the crisis signed the beginning of a period of uncertainty. We’d never experienced a pandemic over the course of our lifetimes and were caught off guard by this unknown and very deadly virus, but as an increasing number of countries around the world have been able to ‘flatten the curve’, we see the number of job openings on the rise once again.  

Will post-COVID-19 hiring be like before? If you ask anyone, they’ll tell you they don’t believe things will go back to ‘normal’, once the current medical emergency reaches its end. But then, what should we expect of the future, when it comes to rehiring post-corona? As Recruitment and Talent Acquisition professionals, how can we make sure to thrive in a post-crisis scenario? you might ask.

As the virus struck, companies worldwide had to quickly adapt to working from home full-time. What if this became the new normal, as many foresee?

What’s expected of companies, in terms of hiring trends? 

How relevant will Candidate Experience be during and after the crisis? 

Many questions cloud our minds with worries, but they also alert us of exciting possibilities for the future. Let’s take a look at some of the current predictions and get a clearer view of what tomorrow could look like for people in Hiring.

How will Talent Acquisition be different during the ‘Great Rehiring’?

Once we fully bounce back, as explained by D’Arcy Coolican and Jeff Jordan, the ‘Great Rehiring’ will start. It won’t have the magnitude of the Unemployment Claims Filed, but this new ‘War For Talent’ will probably remind us of a Blitzkrieg. We can foresee a noticeable change in the composition of candidates, who are currently mostly passive, as active candidates will be on the rise. Meaning, during the times of rehiring post-Corona, people won’t be applying for jobs while working somewhere else as much: applying for jobs will be their full-time activity.

If our predictions are right, companies can expect:

  • Far more applicants per role than they’ve ever seen before
  • A much faster process
  • A fully remote hiring process
  • Far more applicants per role than they’ve ever seen before.
    This will be especially true of candidates coming from suffering industries like hospitality and travel, trying to access more thriving ones like healthcare, or switching to fully remote jobs.
    The volumes could be astonishing, as the system is built for a turnover rate of 3 or 4%, and that number could spike to 30 or 40%, although we hope for a less dramatic outcome.
    Now, there are some questions you can ask yourself to prepare.
    Are you ready to handle this volume? Do you have the right processes in place and is your Talent Acquisition team fully up to speed, or did you do many lay-offs in this team? If you did, then recruiters should be your first hire
  • A much faster process.
    The common benchmark within Recruitment is the fact that you shouldn’t have people in your process for more than 30 days, and in 2018 the average was 38 days.
    Given the scope and urgency of this crisis, the length of the hiring process will decrease drastically: people will have a far different mindset. They’ll be as eager as ever; by then, they will have been in their houses for some time without employment.
    If we wanted to try and take a peek into the future, we would probably direct our glance towards China, which is now entering a post-COVID-19 scenario. Many job seekers there have lowered their salary expectations and are choosing to focus their energy on finding job security, all while competition for jobs among them has become fierce.
    For your future job applicants, timing will be of the essence – and the same will be for you!
  • A fully remote hiring process.
    While this is already the norm for some companies, the vast majority of the businesses out there are still used to having face-to-face interviews with candidates. Now, hiring remotely requires a different approach, since you will miss out on a lot of body language, energy, and small-talk with other team members.
    Video communication will now be key to your interviewing process. You’ll need to get creative with it and structure your interactions so that technology doesn’t get in your way. As much as you’ll need to put some effort into mastering it, it’ll give your candidates a chance to show you their true colors in spite of the logistics of it all, and you will have a shot at showing your culture.

How is a great Candidate Experience still relevant, then?

In a few words, the relevance of Candidate Experience can be reconducted to three factors: 

  • Good candidates won’t take mediocre treatment
  • People talk, and the crisis will end 
  • Select the right talent from the get-go
  • Good candidates won’t take mediocre treatment.
    We recently had the pleasure of interviewing Ellis Briery. During the webinar, he shared how he believes that the relevance of Candidate Experience won’t be suppressed post-crisis. Whether COVID-19 has negatively affected your activity or not, top-tier talent is key to your company’s success. Now, if you want excellent talent, you need to provide them with an excellent hiring process. Especially if you’re looking for future employees with a Bachelor’s degree and higher, do not overlook the fact that they could be less impacted by the crisis, as it gives them leverage.
  • People talk, and the crisis won’t last forever.
    When you start considering the long-term consequences of your actions during this phase, it’ll be clear to you to see that this crisis, too, will end.
    As the economy recovers, job applicants will gain more leverage and will be able to pick the opportunities they prefer.
    Your reputation will precede you, as word of mouth has become more and more relevant, thanks to the democratization of the internet, and now sharing a bad experience only takes a few clicks.
    These are difficult times, and nobody is perfect, but Recruitment and Human Resources mishaps won’t be automatically forgiven because of the current strain on the economy, and there will be negative consequences for those who forget one of Gerry Crispin’s three fundamental rules: putting the candidate first. In fact, there is already a plethora of articles pointing fingers at companies for neglecting their People Experience during the Corona crisis.
    As Debra Corey told us when we interviewed her, “It’s a time that people are going to look back to and say, “Did you live your values, or did you just do what was easiest for you? […] If you’re ever going to bring your values out to play, the time is now.”. Your actions will show your worth.
  • Select the right talent from the get-go.
    As shown in Jobvite’s 2019 Recruiting Benchmark Report, 43% of new hires leave a job that doesn’t meet their expectations.
    The Candidate Experience you provide your job applicants will indelibly shape their opinion of your business. Post-crisis rehiring at scale will already be frantic, and the last thing you’ll want is to have to do it all over again.
    Remember, a happy candidate can be a happy employee, and there’s nothing more precious than motivated and committed high-quality talent. 

If you’re aware of the relevance of good Candidate Experience during a phase of great change such as the one we’re living right now, there are resources you can explore to help you streamline your current hiring process and improve the way you treat your candidates even while recruiting remotely

Why now is the perfect time to start measuring CandE

It’s the right time to do some house-keeping and make sure you have the best process in place for when you’re picking up your post-COVID-19 hiring at full speed.

  • As everything is changing, you shouldn’t let your Candidate Experience deteriorate
  • Don’t forget to be human
  • Because you still have time
  • As everything is changing, you shouldn’t let your Candidate Experience deteriorate.
    The shock brought to the system by the virus is revolutionizing aspects of Recruiting and Talent Acquisition such as the logistics side. As everything is rapidly mutating, you should keep an eye on things when rehiring post-Corona.
    Your candidates’ experience, for instance, will be very different if they won’t have any face-to-face interactions with recruiters in the post-crisis scenario. Whereas this might become our normalcy, right now it could destabilize your potential talent.
    Not taking the pulse of the situation as you perfect your remote hiring methods, could lead you to horrible revelations once it’s too late. That’d mean, for some of you, that you’d discover about these issues only once they’ve already brought irreversible damage to your reputation.
    Asking the right questions, let you learn how to treat your candidates better as times are changing. It can help you streamline better processes.
  • Don’t forget to be human.
    Not so long ago, some recruiters might have exclusively relied on their gut feeling, for hiring purposes. As face-to-face interactions are wildly limited by the current scenario, it will be tougher and tougher to read your counterpart’s body language, for instance, limiting your ability to study them and determine whether they’re feeling comfortable and appreciating your business’ hiring process.
    If you want to know more, it’s advisable to ask your talent, using Candidate Experience surveys. Additionally, asking them about their experience will make them feel more valued and help you connect with them at a more human level. Now more than ever, candidates also want to feel heard, as they too are feeling the anxieties and challenges of the ever-changing Coronavirus situation.
  • Because you still have time.
    Once the ‘Great Rehiring’ will begin, the rhythms will be frenetic, due to the vast amount of candidates and the faster pace of hiring that we expect. Now’s the perfect time to work on your processes, while you still have time to optimize them. 

Develop the right set of questions to ask your recently hired talent as well as your candidates, and you won’t regret it. Some examples mentioned by Bridgette Corridan during our interview with her were “Was this an efficient process?”, “Was it quick enough in your opinion?”, or “Did you feel connected to our mission in the process?”.

Remember Bridgette Corridan’s words, “Candidates are looking for companies that they can connect to and that match their personal values”. 

Too Long; Didn’t Read

Due to COVID-19, Recruitment and Talent Acquisition are transforming. 

Our expectations for the ‘Great Rehiring’ include huge volumes of candidates, a faster pace, and different logistics, which might see us hiring remotely full-time. 

Despite the rise in unemployment rates that’s to be expected, you shouldn’t abandon your Candidate Experience efforts. If anything, once businesses start rehiring post-Corona, these are days people will look back upon, and your actions will let your true colors shine through.

But how does one know they’re doing the right thing when trying to satisfy their job applicants in times of great turmoil? The solution is to measure Candidate Experience. There’s no better time for you to gather feedback from your candidates. Their guidance will help you redirect your post-crisis aim and focus on what matters most. Acting now gives you enough time to optimize your processes based on the insights from your feedback – don’t wait too long! 

Supporting Your Employees Through the Crisis

Employee Engagement in the Time of COVID-19

Supporting your employees during this period can seem daunting, but what if you changed perspective?

As Josh Bersin said in his piece COVID-19 May Be The Best Thing That Ever Happened To Employee Engagement, “Yes, it’s a health crisis but for most companies, it’s also an incredible opportunity to transform.”

Many businesses across the globe are doing their best to treat their employees by higher standards – their efforts translating into excellent measures that have led to Employee Engagement improvements, at last!
Their moves demonstrate that they have understood how important retaining high-quality talent is, to their survival.

As thoroughly explained by Atta Tarki in his book Evidence-Based Recruiting, talent is the vital element to achieving success. These trying times are a stress-test. You might weather this storm if you keep your best talent and manage to incentivize them to perform. So, how do you keep your employees engaged, and make them feel supported during such a phase?

First of All, What Does an Engaged Employee Look Like?

Engagement, Defined

We recently had the pleasure of hosting Debra Corey for an interview, “Supporting Your Employees Through the Crisis”. As she mentioned during the webinar, employees who are engaged, “understand what the company is trying to do, how they fit in, and they want the company to succeed.” Furthermore, those employees feel that “the company believes in them, cares for them, trusts them.” You can achieve this by first understanding their needs.

What Do They Need?

In 1943, Abraham Maslow presented his theory, the hierarchy of needs. It quickly became one of the most important motivational theories in psychology, and it can be represented visually as a pyramid. At the bottom, we have humanity’s basic needs, and as we reach them, we climb further up the pyramid and devote our efforts to the fulfillment of the higher tier of motivating factors.

These are the same needs that you should keep in mind when supporting your staff. Satisfying them is vital in your effort to motivate your employees to perform.

What Worries Your Staff, These Days?

Now that we’ve mentioned what Maslow envisioned as your employees’ needs, let’s unveil what’s on their mind: their fears might help you understand how to better support your staff through this crisis. In Josh Bersin’s article, he showed what were the top issues worrying employees during the first half of April 2020. Bersin’s pool was concentrated in the USA, but we can imagine that the same concerns must be affecting, in some shape or form, employees worldwide.

The employees’ need for personal financial security is key, affecting 81% of the sample. This falls in Maslow’s Safety tier of needs. Two more issues that Bersin identified are health and well-being, as well as the respondents’ families – these worries fall in the Safety and Love, and in the Belonging categories of needs that Maslow theorized.
Finally, productivity and work worry 24% of the respondents. The switch to remote work is forcing companies to quickly adapt, and make it possible for employees to perform in unforeseen logistical settings.

We will consider the main categories of worries that Bersin found through his study in this article, but as shared by Debra Corey during our interview, it is fundamental for you to listen to your people, even when you stumble upon an initiative, idea, or approach that seems applicable to your specific situation. Nothing should be given for granted.

I’ll give you an example. Some businesses have been able to identify disruptive solutions to their COVID-induced financial woes by having uncomfortable conversations with their employees. As it turns out, in some companies, the staff opted for salary cuts in order to avoid lay-offs. Listening truly is important!

Do you need another reason to probe with your staff? You could be wasting your resources on initiatives that they deem irrelevant, all while not addressing their most pressing concerns.

Ask For Their Opinions

Even during these times, it is possible to listen to your employees and figure out their specific needs. Some companies organize forums, but a simple survey can also be very helpful. At Starred, we receive a feedback form in our inbox on a weekly basis. It’s short and simple but allows us to share our thoughts and concerns with upper management. If you would appreciate the help of an expert on the matter, Debra Corey collaborated with us on a Free COVID-19 Employee Pulse Survey. Due to the current circumstances, it will be available to you, free of charge and with no strings attached, for three months.

Debra’s Main Takeaways

During our interview with Debra Corey, we asked her what were some impactful actions for businesses to take in response to this crisis.

Supporting Your Employees: The Short-Term Moves

Lifting the Mood

Some companies have made commendable efforts to show their employees some support since the very beginning of this pandemic.
For instance, the Dutch fair trade confectionery company Tony’s Chocolonely sent their employees a “survival box”, including gourmet food from local producers. Their attempt was aimed at lifting their talent’s mood through a special pampering moment during a time of great stress.

Our own CEO took a similar approach with a recent initiative, which saw him taking the staff out for dinner. Remotely, it goes without saying. The employees were given the opportunity to order one meal on company expenses. “Not having to do groceries, not having to cook and, most importantly, no dirty dishes, are the perfect ingredients for a chilled evening.”, Lars said in his Slack message sharing the initiative.

Help Your Staff Deliver

Businesses across the world have helped, financially or logistically, their employees in setting up their new home office.
Some employers have paid for better internet connection for their employees, some have shipped or delivered useful tools from the office, or ordered them online, to help their staff be productive under these unpredictable circumstances.

Not everyone lives in a two-bedroom apartment. Some employees will have to face more complex adjustments than others. The survey below, led by SHRM in the US to analyze teleworking in the time of COVID-19, shows that 14% of the interviewed selected “other” as their current work station. Debra shared that she’d heard of people working from their ironing board! That definitely wins the creativity award.

Supporting Your Employees: Actions For the Long Run

There are things that your HR department should do and keep on investing in, in the long run. 

Talk the Talk

“Communication is the lifeline to our employees now more than ever.” – Debra Corey

One thing that companies need to pay closer attention to is communication.
It is more important now than ever to maintain and foster the connection you have with your employees.
So, how should your communication be? It should be open and honest, even when it comes to talking about the financial state of the company, and it should be two-sided – listen to what your employees have to say back.
Furthermore, communication should take place in lots of different ways, and over and over again – in fact, redundancy is now acquiring a positive connotation, as it allows you to reach your interlocutor and cut through the noise generated by everything that’s happening around us, these days. Finally, communication should be human.

At Starred, we’ve understood how vital our interactions are, and to make sure that everyone feels that there’s an open-door policy, our CEO has recently started hosting AMA (Ask Me Anything) sessions online. The new initiative has been warmly welcomed by my colleagues and me, who had the chance to take some concerns off our chest with the same ease as when we weren’t physically apart.

If you have any doubts about how to best utilize video as a media to replace in-person interactions, you can watch our interview with Elena Valentine. The video expert shared the importance of being vulnerable and embracing imperfections, when on-camera.

Are Your Managers Prepared?

In Debra’s words, “We’re expecting a lot more out of our managers. If you haven’t taken the time to give your managers the training and the support that they need, you need to do that.”
Managers need to show they care, and CEOs do too – we’ve heard of Chief Executive Officers filming “a day in the life of” videos and sharing them with their employees, to show how their days look like now that we’re locked in due to the pandemic.

How should management act to support your employees? They should:
1. Be human
2. Say “thank you”
3. Stay connected
4. Lead with empathy
5. Lead with compassion
6. Be authentic

Expectations of Managers during the Corona pandemic

Just as expectations increased for managers, these days, their own should be readjusted when it comes to the level of performance they can demand their employees to deliver. In times in which we’re pestered by an endless series of interruptions, we cannot expect people to work as easily as they did before. In fact, Debra Corey saw this as the biggest mistake made by HR these days: businesses trying to pretend that these new rhythms and circumstances are normal, expecting the same that they did in the past.

Holistic Wellness

Your employees’ wellness comes in many shapes and forms. It involves 5 main spheres: physical, social, mental, financial, and community. Let’s take a closer look at some of these.

  • Physical. Your collaborators are stuck inside their apartment. In some cases, depending on where you are while reading this article, it’s almost impossible for them to leave their house even to go for a walk. Some businesses have invested in special classes, from yoga and meditation to more intense activities, to help maintain their health.
  • Social. Companies are getting more and more creative with this. Initiatives to impact your employees’ social wellness can go from hosting after-work Friday drinks on Google Hangouts to organizing cooking classes with a chef, or even hiring a company like Stage Presence, to provide the staff with remote entertainment, such as a live concert they can attend altogether while in lockdown.
  • Mental. Special initiatives have been tailored to support employees mentally, too. For instance, some businesses have hired coaches or given their talent access to platforms such as Better Help, to alleviate their anguish during this period. Starbucks has invested in free therapy for its staff, including part-time workers. 20 sessions a year, as well as unlimited access to certain apps, are included in their effort towards protecting their employees’ mental wellbeing.

More Examples

Some companies are giving their employees more flexible benefits and investing in their education.
“Training departments always struggle to get people to consume their programs. Not now.” – Josh Bersin. The training doesn’t only involve business topics but is extended to literature, yoga, breadmaking, and more.
Furthermore, employees are sometimes invited to take paid holidays, to help them achieve balance during these times. Other than investing in a mental health program, Starbucks offered a “catastrophe pay” to the baristas exposed to the virus, including 14 days of paid leave for those diagnosed with it, exposed to it, or in close contact with someone who had it, extending the eligibility to those at risk, when a doctor’s note was presented.

We’ve seen several ways you can use to retain your employees and maintain, if not improve, their well-being during these challenging times, but not all businesses are given that chance. As the Corona crisis hits us all financially, some businesses face extreme difficulties. It’s in response to these challenges that they show their true colors.
Luxottica is an Italian eyewear conglomerate and the world’s largest company in the eyewear industry. As the Corona crisis impacted Italy in a particularly brutal way, many companies found themselves applying for the Wage Guarantee Funds, short-term allowances that help them go by, keeping their employees in standby while receiving part of their usual salary.
Luxottica decided to integrate 100% of the salary of the people who are kept at home, paid a €500 bonus to those who keep on working, and encouraged its directors to cut their own salaries, in line with what the CEO did to reduce his own. The goal was to be able to pay all their employees in spite of it all.

When laying off employees is an unavoidable decision, don’t forget that it can be done while treating the staff respectfully.
Most recently, Airbnb has had to make that decision and did so with tact and transparency. In a letter from the CEO Brian Chesky, the reasons for laying off 1,900 employees were shared with the entire company, as well as the technicalities the decision entailed, all while showing appreciation for the departing employees’ efforts, whose talent helped make Airbnb.

Another company worthy of mention is Personio. The German HR software company made the office-to-home-working transition very easy, letting their employees order desks, chairs, cushions, and internet boosters whenever needed, in order to achieve the right at-home office setup. “We were given a free subscription to Freeletics to keep fit and exercise during the day,” said Adriana Kubikova, Account Executive UK & Ireland. “We also have a whole HomeOffice Task Force team constantly coming up with ideas and events to keep us engaged. For instance, we have Pub Quizzes, remote lunches, and coffee breaks chosen at random via our Roulette system, online yoga, MTV Cribs Home Edition, and various online games.”
They also set up a weekly newsletter with the plan for the following week, with various how-to’s, for example, teaching the staff how to run more effective Zoom meetings. The newsletter also includes tools to help their employees with their well-being and motivation and maximize their work-from-home productivity.
On Monday mornings, Personio’s founder runs a quick meeting with the whole company to remind them of their mission and to wish them a good week. The Employer Branding Manager, responsible for the HomeOffice Task Force, presents various updates and new ideas, too.
Also, Personio allows parents to work 25% less without any reduction in their salary if the children are at home because of closed schools.

To Conclude

Debra Corey on values during this Crisis

Whatever aspect your initiatives will touch, make sure you take them while living your values. “It’s a time that people are going to look back to and say, “Did you live your values, or did you just do what was easiest for you? […] If you’re ever going to bring your values out to play, the time is now.”, said Debra Corey.

Our values are the glue that keeps us together, and this crisis is the perfect time to use them to make your employees feel the support they need and deserve. Remember Josh Bersin’s words? This crisis can be your chance to transform.
Don’t forget to keep open and two-sided communication with them. Ask the right questions, and your efforts will address the issues that concern your staff the most.

Starred & Greenhouse: the Onboarding Process

By now, you’ve probably heard of Candidate Experience and why it’s so important to start measuring it within your organization.
What you might be wondering is “What does it look like to set up a Candidate Experience feedback process within my organization?”
In this article, we will take you through all the necessary steps of our onboarding process for implementing the Starred Candidate Experience feedback solution automated with Greenhouse. This way, you’ll know what you’re getting into and will have no surprises! 

We promise to get you live with 2 feedback touchpoints within the month. In order to get there, these are the steps in the onboarding process: 

Week 1: Kick-off + setting up your Starred account

The first thing we do during our onboarding process is to hold a kick-off meeting with the main users and stakeholders. During this kick-off meeting, we discuss first of all your goals for Candidate Experience in general, and then we get into your more specific feedback goals. We determine the process you want to follow when asking for feedback: this means going over your Greenhouse candidate stages and determining what would be the best time to send candidates or hiring managers a survey about their experience. We also do a short platform training, so that you have all the tools you need to get started. You will get a comprehensive checklist with all the tasks to be completed each week before going live. For the first week, this means setting up your Starred account and organizing all settings and users as needed.

Week 2: Determining questions + connecting to Greenhouse

Week 2 of our onboarding process is all about getting your questions ready and creating your surveys in Starred. Going back to the kick-off document and the goals we determined in week 1 will help you make sure that you ask the right questions. Of course, you can always use our template gallery with a variety of best practice surveys for lots of different situations. During the same week, you should also connect your Starred and Greenhouse accounts, for which you need a Greenhouse admin user account. The connection takes about 5 minutes to complete and is super easy to follow through, once you watch our video tutorial.

Week 3: Setting up workflows + testing

Your surveys are ready, you’ve connected Greenhouse and Starred, now it’s time to build your workflows. A workflow consists of the combination of a trigger and an action. For example, a trigger could be the instance in which the candidates are rejected at the interview stage, and the corresponding action could be to send a “Rejected at Interview Stage” survey from Starred their way. Once you enable this, each time a candidate is rejected at the interview stage, they will get the correct survey from Starred, without you having to do anything. It’s good to do a few tests before enabling it, to make sure everything is set up correctly.

Week 4: Go-Live!

Once you’ve created your workflows, ran some tests and made sure everything looks good, your onboarding process is almost complete: it’s time to go live with feedback. Receiving the first answers from your candidates is always exciting – and sometimes it can be a little scary too. Our Customer Success team will help you with interpreting your results and guiding you in setting up a good process for acting on feedback during the following couple of weeks.

Below, you’ll find a few words that a recently onboarded customer shared about his experience:

What our customers say about our onboarding process

On Our Partnership With Zapier to Automate your CandE

We are proud to announce that we have partnered up with Zapier to enable our users to automate their Candidate Experience feedback process by connecting to 2000+ apps.

Zapier is an online automation tool that connects your favorite apps, such as Gmail, Slack, Mailchimp, and more. You can connect two or more apps to automate repetitive tasks without having to code or to rely on developers to build the integration for you. It’s easy enough that anyone can build their own app workflows with just a few clicks.

Automated Candidate Experience Feedback

Zapier is home to 60+ HR & Recruitment connectors including applications like Greenhouse, BambooHR, Recruitee, and Workable. Starred’s connector enables you to build Zaps that can automatically trigger feedback surveys to both candidates and hiring managers upon hiring-related decisions such as candidate rejections. 

Some of the ATSs that you can integrate with through Zapier

The Integration with Recruitee

Recruitee users have been using our beta Zapier connector to automate their Candidate Experience. Below are some of the widespread use-cases which we have converted into Zap templates:

  • Measuring the candidates’ experience with your job site and application process by automatically sending a Starred survey their way when they apply for a job
  • Measuring the candidates’ experience with your hiring process by automatically sending a scheduled Starred survey their way when they get rejected in Recruitee 

The Importance of Candidate Experience Feedback

Poor Candidate Experience negatively impacts your ability to attract the top talent you need by damaging your employer brand and your referrals by classic or digital word of mouth, and it can ultimately erode your customer base, too. 

Looking Ahead

With this partnership, Starred establishes itself as the industry leader in the Candidate Experience feedback space. By building upon the partnership with Zapier, our native integration partners such as Greenhouse and SmartRecruiter, and our People Experience product line, we envision a tomorrow where we are improving people’s work-life by giving them a voice. 

On the Power of the Weekly Pulse Survey

Why is Having a Weekly Pulse Survey So Important?

Not being able to see each other at the office every day can make managers feel like they don’t have control over their employees’ degree of satisfaction. Yet, the employees’ happiness and engagement should be a top priority for any business. Not only it helps with employee retention, but it boosts productivity as well.

As a matter of fact, 87% of employees worldwide are not engaged at work, and companies with highly engaged workforces outperform their peers by 147% in earnings per share

When at a distance, it is even more important for management to show they value their staff. 

But how to do that, you ask?

At Starred, we’ve been using the Weekly Pulse Survey for about two years. It consists of a respondent-friendly form that’s sent out at a weekly frequency. 

A staff pulse survey consists of no more than 3-5 questions that are used to check in with the employees.

It’s, therefore, a quick survey to fill that gets sent out on a regular basis. It provides management with a way to take the temperature of the organization on various topics such as job roles, work environment, communication, employee satisfaction, and more.

Our own Pulse Survey only includes a question rating the level of satisfaction of the staff on a scale from one to ten, with a possible additional comment.

Our Weekly Pulse Survey Invite

For what concerns the frequency, we would recommend to send your Pulse survey out every week if you’re a smaller organization or if you lead a dynamic business, such as a tech scale-up. Our advice to larger companies is to send out the form on a monthly basis. Alternatively, you could split your workforce into four batches and address one a week. This way, the respondents would fill in your survey once a month, but you’d be able to get part of the feedback on a weekly basis.

Delivering these surveys often sends a message to your employees: you place importance on what they have to say, and you go the extra mile to listen to them. Yet, currently, whereas 90% of organizations roll out traditional large-scale engagement surveys, only 19% use informal pulse surveys throughout the year.

Tenure is a particularly delicate subject for those businesses employing younger talent, as there seems to be a correlation between youth and the number of years spent with one company. 

Thus, for the more dynamic and agile companies out there, such as the typical Silicon Valley tech businesses, it seems to be particularly relevant to make sure that their employees are satisfied.

If you don’t believe that devoting attention to your staff matters, just think that 53% of more than 2,000 surveyed U.S. adults reported that they’d remain with their current employers for a longer time if they felt like they were more appreciated by their bosses.

The Pulse Survey’s weekly frequency is crucial to our process. One big survey per quarter or even per year won’t cut it, as it won’t give the employer any time to make the necessary changes to ensure a positive Employee Experience. Sending out forms often, lets the managers address potential issues before the situation takes a dramatic turn.

This does not mean that you should use the Weekly Pulse Survey instead of your traditional annual survey. It’s an additional element in your feedback gathering that gives a certain consistency to the process. This way, your quarterly or bi-yearly Engagement Survey won’t come as a surprise to your talent. 

Sending out Pulse Surveys so frequently can also help you save costs. There are hidden financial benefits to this. It takes a few minutes for your employees to fill in a survey, and that’s not that expensive for your business. Now, compare this cost to the time and money you’d have to devote to putting out metaphorical fires, in case there was a big problem and you only realized it too late!

What easier way for a CEO of taking the temperature of their organization? 

The segmentation of the Weekly Pulse Survey results lets you drill down on the most affected departments and take the appropriate actions to mend what’s broken. 

The data we get from these surveys is precious information to be shared during the Weekly CEO Update – another initiative that here at Starred we warmly recommend for you to apply. Afterward, address those problems directly through tailored initiatives. 

Such outreach shows your employees that you devote your attention to their happiness and you have the willingness it takes to do something to address the issues they encountered.
Sadly, at the moment, 27% of managers never review survey results, and 52% of them do but then take no action whatsoever.

The message that the Weekly Pulse Survey implicitly sends is one that promotes open communication. Your employees’  freedom of- and comfort in expressing their thoughts, concerns, and motivations is important for your business.

This means that the survey’s anonymity is fundamental to help your employees feel comfortable in sharing their concerns with the current management, or their role in the organization. It’s your only way of making sure that the comments you receive are brutally honest. 

To reassure your employees that their answers won’t be connected to their name, you can utilize a third-party tool.

Furthermore, remember that if a culture of open communication is established, your talent’s morale will benefit from it accompanied by a boost in engagement.

Why Do We Cherish Our Weekly Pulse Survey So Much?

The absence of non-verbal communication is mostly missing, these days, and it can hardly be replaced by video messaging or conferencing. It’s harder to feel if people are still happy and engaged without asking them directly, and these stressful days make it even more important for your employees to feel heard.

Pulse surveys are a great tool for evaluating reactions to the changes that have been implemented inside an organization. Most companies are probably fine-tuning their processes, these days, and they’d benefit from checking their employees’ reactions to them.

The Weekly Pulse Survey can monitor if the engagement and happiness of your workforce are still at the same level. In case of sudden drops, it’s time for your managers to take action and change the current way of working.

How Does the Weekly Pulse Survey Help You Improve Your Employee Experience?

Below we’ll list some things you can do to take full advantage of your new Weekly Pulse Survey:

  1. Make sure it comes at the exact same time – at Starred, we do it every Friday afternoon at 14:00. In order to maintain this timely consistency, automation is key.
  2. Make the filling of the survey feel effortless for your employees. Once they open the email, one click should be sufficient for them to complete it – and will only cost them around 3 seconds of their time. 
  3. If your people had a bad week, ask them to provide a comment for context. Of course, the survey is anonymous and the comments don’t have to be indicative of who they are, but their specificity can help you unveil issues. 
  4. Take actions on the Weekly Pulse Survey every week by bundling the comments in a couple of clusters and communicating the insights you gained from their content to the team,  and then by crafting tailored responses and checking your talent’s reaction to the latter in the following cycle.

TL;DR

Trying to maintain your staff happy and engaged is even harder than usual when at a distance.
We keep the situation under control through our Weekly Pulse Survey. 

A pulse survey is an informal and short survey, with usually less than 5 questions, that gets sent with a higher frequency than you would for your annual, bi-annual or quarterly feedback forms. The Weekly Pulse Survey that we use at Starred, gets sent to the staff every Friday at 2 PM and includes just one question in the form of a query concerning their satisfaction in the workplace, graded from 1 to 10, offering them to write down comments if they feel like it. 

This, first of all, makes our staff feel heard, which increases their happiness and engagement. It also helps us reduce some costs: we spot problems early on and can address them before we need to put out any fires. 

The weekly frequency adds consistency to your feedback process. The employees will share the issues they noticed during the previous week, and they will have the opportunity to go in-depth in their comments. The anonymity of our feedback forms encourages them to share their concerns, thus promoting a culture of open communication and constructive feedback.

Once we collect the data, we then share the insights in our weekly CEO update. This shows the talent that their results are looked at and actually taken into consideration. We then follow up with action plans to address and resolve those issues and test the employees’ reactions to such plans in the following cycle. 

As you can’t rely on face-to-face interactions, these days, what better way to make sure that your employees are doing alright than to ask them through a Weekly Pulse Survey? 

Let your employees’ voices be heard! 

Good Candidate Experience Practices While Remote Hiring

Good Candidate Experience shouldn’t be sacrificed in a digital environment. Remote hiring is becoming standard practice in modern businesses, and with the relevance of Candidate Experience in mind, it’s time to polish your digital etiquette. We collected a series of best practices for you to implement. 

If we imagine a hiring process uniquely developed in an online space, we need to start by mapping out the Candidate Journey Funnel. The phases that compose it involve both active and, even more importantly, passive candidates. 


The Candidate Journey Funnel

Your Candidate Journey Funnel

Your Candidate Journey Funnel starts with awareness, the phase in which the potential candidates find out about your vacancy. 

Once they become aware of your company and job opening, they enter the phase of consideration, and they will do some research on you.

After that, your potential job applicants reach the interest phase. They will compare you to a few other potential employers and dig deeper into your employer branding.

These first steps usually occur in the displayed order for active candidates, but passive candidates enter the equation from the next phase onward.

And so, the much-anticipated application process begins. This is the first time that the candidate shares information with your business. Afterward, you start communicating – you can, and should, reach out to the applicants to confirm you received their applications, and to potentially share information concerning the structure and length of the hiring process. 

The selection phase follows, and you’ll assess and interview your candidates. They might have to take part in business cases or simulations of job-specific problems that they may face in the workplace. Finally, you’ll hire the talent you prefer. Once they sign the contract, the on-boarding process starts and the new employees are introduced to their team and role.

The 5 Dimensions of Candidate Experience

Now that we’ve quickly reviewed the funnel, let’s look into what you mustn’t forget in order to provide your applicants with good Candidate Experience in your remote hiring process. 

During our interview with the Candidate Experience expert Gerry Crispin, he told us about the 5 main elements impacting the candidates’ perception of your hiring process.

He was referring to closure, setting expectations, fairness, listening, and accountability. “These 5 practices are weighted differently by culture and by level and by a variety of other dimensions,” Gerry said, “but they are a foundation for how the candidates are driven to share that their experience was good, bad, or somewhere in between.”

In what way can you make sure to meet your applicants’ expectations throughout your remote hiring process? We’ll provide you with a step-by-step analysis inclusive of mistakes to avoid, applicable advice, and tool recommendations.

Best Practices, Step by step

Let’s start with the active candidates. To make sure they’ll find your job posting, you can utilize job boards and social media.
The latter has the potential to let you showcase your company culture, which is an important element for candidates to consider, when deciding whether to work for you. Perhaps it’s time to build your own strategy for these channels.
In order to entice potential candidates to apply, remember that video is a powerful tool. As a matter of fact, the candidate application rate increases by 34% when a video message is included in your job posting. During this phase, make sure you offer clear, respectful, and insightful information – this can help you set expectations. Pay particular attention to your communication not being biased and discriminatory against any minority. There are a variety of tools that can help you in the process, with various degrees of complexity. To start, the Gender Decoder for Job Ads is a basic tool that you can easily implement. Fairness is, as previously mentioned, one of the 5 dimensions of good Candidate Experience, so don’t let any applicant feel left out.

“You don’t need “solid” performers. You need “star” performers.” These are the words of Atta Tarki in his book Evidence-Based Recruiting. He also mentions how, possibly, top talent is barely ever unemployed, even during economic downturns. How to attract them, since job boards don’t cut it? Luckily there are some very good tools like Personio, Hunter, or Hiretual out there to help you in the process. Once you figure out how to reach out to your new potential candidates, remember not to be intimidating or disrespectful in your outbound messages. This is the first interaction with someone you might soon want on your team.

Now, onto your application process. What can be done there? 
This phase needs to be as sleek and user-friendly as possible. This is why it’s crucial for the tools thate candidates can use to apply to your vacancy to be mobile-friendly. 90% of modern-day job seekers look for their dream job via their phone – lagging behind is no longer an option.
If you don’t yet understand the importance of keeping the application process simple, know that a CareerBuilder research quotes that 60% of candidates drop an application halfway through because of its complexity. If you’re looking for some advice on how to tackle this, don’t ask them to input the same information more than once, simplify the document upload process, and minimize the number of steps needed.
On top of that, do your best to make your career page impressive. It can truly impact the candidates’ perception of your business to see you’ve put in effort to create an unique space that lets them comfortably browse your vacancies while learning more about your company. The Netflix Jobs page is a good example of what a high-quality career page looks like.
If you work for a big company, it’s probable that you’re receiving hundreds of Curriculum Vitae, so an ATS and a good resume parser go a long way. They let you easily store your applicants’ information and skim through to take out of your pool those candidates whose profiles are incompatible with your expectations. This will help you be quicker, other than better organized, and in the digital world, speed is key. As much as the lack of bias is relevant throughout the hiring process, this is particularly true for the application stage. Several tools have been developed for this purpose.

There will be very little human interaction with your candidates, so it’s crucial that you take communication seriously. You should be promptly informing them after every relevant step, starting from their application and including the interview and assessment phase. It’s vital that they have a clear understanding of the steps in your hiring process, of how they’re timed, and of what is expected of them. You should also maintain your potential and current applicants informed of which vacancies have closed, removing old job postings and reaching out to let them know if another candidate has been selected. This helps you set expectations.
Clarity and speed are important elements at play, so don’t have your candidates wait for days for an update. But if letting too much time go by is a costly mistake, taking too little time before rejecting your candidates at any stage, be it after receiving their CV or after an interview or assessment, could make them feel dehumanized and unfairly dismissed. Do you know what’s worse than reaching out too soon or too late? Not reaching out at all. Keep in mind that your job applicants deserve closure.
Friendliness is another important ingredient to acing your communication. We encourage you to treat your candidates like “human beings with feelings”, as Greg Savage wrote in his book The Savage Truth. Build rapport. This means putting your candidates at ease in a digital context that might otherwise feel cold. For the same reason, it’s recommended to give a short call to the candidates whose applications you just received – this will let you break the ice, other than probe a little. A call is warmer than an email, and videos feel even more personal. 
Remember what the candidates share with you. An ATS can help you with this. If they feel like you don’t know who they are after already having sent over their information and perhaps even interacted with you, they won’t feel heard, and they’ll think they’re but a number to you.
Communication isn’t a one-way street, which is why you must remember to be reachable too. After all, accountability is one of the crucial dimensions of Candidate Experience.
Finally, make sure to provide your rejected candidates with feedback whenever needed: that is, after relevant touchpoints, and especially once rejected. In this specific case, this could occasionally lead to awkward conversations. Don’t forget to be human. If the content of your feedback could feel embarrassing or personal, warn your rejected candidate about it. If they still want to know why they didn’t make it through the hiring process, then politely tell them the reason behind their dismissal. Sharing the logic behind their rejection with your candidates will help them see the fairness in your selection process.

We mentioned that video communication is important. Let’s read why, in the words of Tamara Grigg, Head of Marketing at VideoMyJob.

Tamara Grigg on Video Communication for Remote Hiring

As we previously mentioned, the selection phase can include an assessment of the applicant. There are two main kinds of assessments, and both can be tested online. A tool like eSkill can help you lead a comprehensive cognitive analysis of your candidates. 
Since you won’t be meeting your candidate face-to-face, adding a psychometric assessment could be useful, especially for those roles with a higher level of complexity, where a more articulated selection process isn’t detrimental to your Candidate Experience. For this purpose, you can utilize a plethora of tests, including Myers-Briggs Type Indicator or the Caliper Profile, just to mention a couple. None of these steps should come as a surprise to your candidates, if you maintain a frequent, clear, and honest communication with them. 
The selection phase involves at least one interview, too. It’s vital to provide your applicants with all the needed information in their interview invitation. This includes date and time, link, tool you’ll use, structure of the interview, or any software they might need to install for it beforehand,.
Onto interview etiquette. Here’s some applicable advice. Make sure, first of all, that there’s a plan B, in case the connection gets cut unexpectedly. It’s also important to set up the interview in a quiet space where you won’t be interrupted, and to double-check your tools to make sure they work before starting the call. This involves both the hardware, such as your headphones and microphone, and the software. Make sure that your surroundings are proper, just like your attire. You and the space you call from must look polished and professional.
Interviews are a particularly tense step for all job applicants, therefore do all you can to make that sure everything is in order and be friendly and polite. Be the first one to show up. No one likes to be stood up. If you know you’ll be late, make sure to give the candidate notice – don’t disrespect them by wasting their time. Don’t forget to review their profile in your ATS, either. You don’t want them to feel like you have no idea who they are.
Ease into the interview with some chit-chat. Ask them how they’re doing and some more non-work related, yet respectful questions. This will warm up the conversation.
Address potentially undisclosed information on your end by asking the candidates if there’s anything else they’d like to know about your business or the job. Remember that it isn’t only the candidate that needs to be approved by your business, but your business needs to be approved by the candidate, too. Asking questions like this one will remove ambiguities and make your applicants feel heard.
Some businesses, instead of conducting one-on-one remote interviews, prefer to choose collaborative hiring interviews. What it entails is that a group of employees interact with the candidate at the same time. It can be useful in case you don’t want to miss out on possible information during your interaction with the aim of making better decisions, but as it can be even more stressful for the candidate to face more than one interviewer, make sure to put the applicant at ease. If this is the path you decide to take, try to have all the members of the hiring team make up their mind separately before they share their opinions, so to avoid groupthink.
Since the candidate won’t be able to physically visit the office and meet the rest of the employees, you can share images or videos of the space they might end up working in, and perhaps put them in touch with someone from the team, so they can probe on more personal matters and get a better feel of your company culture.
As a potential final step, there are reference-checks. Tools like XREF and SkillSurvey can facilitate things if, for instance, you handle large volumes of candidates at a time. Be tactful in your request for their former employers’ contacts and during your conversation with them.

Communication, once more, is crucial. This is why after your assessment and interviews you should take the time to reach out in the most personal way possible to inform the candidates about their progress and manage their expectations.
As we mentioned rapport, and since this entire recruiting process is taking place in a digital environment, it could be nice to send the hired candidates a branded kit, with mugs, t-shirts or other trinkets that make them feel that they’re part of the team.

Remembering the 5 Dimensions of Candidate Experience

How can you make your candidates happy, then, according to Gerry Crispin’s 5 dimensions of Candidate Experience?

  • Closure. Don’t leave your candidates hanging. Inform them of their position in the hiring process, and make sure to reject them tactfully and at the right time. Always make them feel respected.
  • Setting Expectations. Lying to your candidates about the time it’ll take for you to reach out or about the easiness of your hiring process, is a poorly played move. Make sure that your applicants are aware of what’s ahead of them.
  • Fairness. Your candidates shouldn’t feel discriminated against or rushedly judged. For the same reason, it’s wise to implement debiasing solutions and you mustn’t reject them immediately after one of the steps, or else they’ll feel like they never had a chance to begin with. Sharing your feedback when you reject them will also help them see your process is fair.
  • Listening. Keeping a line of communication and building a rapport with your applicants is crucial. Do your best to remember what they share with you. They must feel comfortable and heard.
  • Accountability. Do what you promised, respect the announced timeline and follow the criteria you said you would. Be reachable, and be sure to take responsibility if a mistake is made.

Remote recruiting can be complex to handle, especially if you’re new to it. To make sure that your Candidate Experience isn’t negatively impacted by it, try and implement feedback collection. The data you gather will let you know what your areas of improvement are before they heavily affect your business.

Mentoring and Coaching: the Secret to Good People Experience

Mentoring and coaching go way back, and they could really improve your People Experience.

The concept of mentoring has existed since the dawn of civilization – its existence is biblical, or even older. In fact, it originated with Homer’s Odyssey in the 8th century B.C., where the character of Mentor nurtures and supports Odysseus’ son, Telemachus.
Mentoring became common practice in the Middle Ages, culminating in its recognition as a vital tool in the development of business executives in the 1970s. Its pervasiveness only increased over time, and it is now perceived as a relevant way to help with the growth not only of decision-makers but junior staff members, too. 

The process of mentoring has been embodied by several historical figures in different fields over time, starting in ancient days with Socrates and Plato, and leading to the more recent Mark Markkula and Steve Jobs. Mentors have also been represented in pop-culture. You’ll probably remember the Yoda and Luke Skywalker duo, who surely left a mark on our imagination!

Coaching, despite being more recent, has also stood the test of time. Much has happened since the term was coined in the 1830s as Oxford University slang, to indicate tutors carrying students through exams. Coaching gradually grew over time, with its introduction in the business world by IBM and the birth of the GROW model

We’re familiar with coaching and mentoring in our daily lives, but some still treat the two terms as interchangeable, and that is an incorrect assumption. So, what do mentoring and coaching truly entail? And how do they differentiate one from another?

A mentor is usually a successful individual with a reactive capacity, sharing their wisdom to provide insight and guidance, as their mentee encounters challenges along their journey. They don’t always have expertise in their mentee’s field but must have an understanding of how to navigate the business in general.
During a conversation with my colleague Mo, he shared memories from his mentee days. “A good mentor is someone who can guide you, who uplifts you, and you can make mistakes in front of while not being embarrassed,” he told me.

What do coaches do, then? Theyre often experts in the field they help their coachees in, which is perfect for employees and entrepreneurs with specific needs. They’re often trained and certified as coaches and possess strong process-management skills.
Whereas the relationship between mentor and mentee can go on for a long span of time, usually coaching programs have a preset deadline.

The fact is, both mentors and coaches can play a vital role in your organization, and they’re not mutually exclusive. If anything, they’re complementary. 

During our interview with Gerry Crispin, the Candidate Experience specialist discussed the rising trends in Talent Acquisition. Every year, the expert conducts a panel discussion in which he interviews brilliant, young professionals. 

Crispin came to the realization that there’s a growing need for both mentors and coaches to accompany the new star talent on their path: a mentor can convince them that they’ve chosen the right organization to work for, and a coach can make them stay in the long run. Both are important figures whose relevance is connected to the career stage the employee or entrepreneur is facing. 

Therefore we can state that an important difference between mentorship and coaching is related to the stage of the workers’ career lifecycle they touch: in one’s early stage, there’s the need for a seasoned mentor to respond to basic concerns and challenges – someone who can offer broader advice and connections for the mentee to grow. It’s at a more mature stage that the employee or entrepreneur faces more granular and nuanced issues.

When Gerry Crispin asked them about what excites them about their current position, the young professionals involved in his panel discussion mentioned a mentor: the one figure who can help them navigate the job, as well as the company culture. The mentee can benefit from the relationship by understanding how influence takes place, and how decisions are made, among other things.

This increasing desire to have mentor springs from a “recognition on the part of bright, young people coming into the workforce that they haven’t had all the kinds of experiences they need in order to succeed in a certain job,” says Crispin. This tells us that companies need to start curating the kind of information that allows people to understand clearly what is expected in order to be successful within the organization.  

During his panel discussion, Gerry Crispin also asked the five young professionals involved what their current company would have to do to keep them working for them in two years’ time. The answer was unanimous. If they don’t have a coach by then, it’s time to leave.

If at the beginning of their career they want someone to help them succeed where they are, in the present, a coach helps the brilliant, young workforce better understand where they want to be in the future, and what their path could look like.

“You’re going to have to chop down some trees in the woods to figure out what your path is going to be in a world that is changing this rapidly.”, says Gerry Crispin. And this desire on the part of the new workforce is a sign that employers need to focus on internal mobility. 

“Career success is more than an individual thing – a collective of people who care about each other and are helping each other be successful. Most companies do not describe themselves as a community. They’re going to have to think about that.”

In “Why Mentoring Matters in a Hypercompetitive World“, we read how Professional Service Firms (PSFs) lacking the collegiality and the sense of partnership that they had in their early days will struggle to recruit – let alone retain – the talent that they need to survive. “Young professionals are still looking for mentors who can give them advice, encouragement, and space to grow.”
When looking at Professional Service Firms, the relationships between more senior and junior employees, which was once based on solemn agreements, now shifted to having a contractual nature. The reason for this change is the strain put on corporations by the global market, which caused investments in mentoring programs to atrophy. When the competition got fierce, something had to give, resulting in either lower quality or total absence of mentoring programs. The issue is that the younger generations of employees aren’t as loyal as their predecessors, and will only stay until a better offer comes along.

A Harvard Business Review- and Oxford Economics study confirms the need for coaching. “1,400 Millennials told us they want more feedback from their managers”, says Karie Willyerd in Millennials Want to Be Coached at Work. “Their number one source of development is their manager, but only 46% agreed that their managers delivered on their expectation for feedback.” One of them said “I would like to move ahead in my career. And to do that, it’s very important to be in touch with my manager, constantly getting coaching and feedback from him so that I can be more efficient and proficient.” 

Now, onto the benefits. Why are mentoring- and coaching programs truly worth the investment, you ask?

The article “The ROI of Mentoring Young Talent” says that mentions of ROI can cloud conversations on mentoring, but instilling legacy knowledge in another team member cannot easily be quantified. On top of that, the mentor-mentee relationship can be a two-way street. The mentor could, for instance, benefit from it by developing their own leadership and managerial skills, gaining recognition, reinforcing their knowledge of the matter at hand, and enhancing their CV, just to mention a few perks.

What is undeniable is that the impact of both mentoring and coaching the overall company can be profound, with a humbling and inspiring effect. A study found that leadership coaching can deliver an ROI of 5.7 times the cost.

Another research had thirty-one managers undergo a managerial training program followed by one-on-one executive coaching. The training increased productivity by 22.4%, and the coaching improved it by 88%!

The International Coach Federation also gathered interesting data: the executives and entrepreneurs using a business coach can increase their net income by 46% on average. 62.4% of the sample developed a more intelligent goal-setting, 57.1% experienced lowered anxiety levels, 52.4% saw their self-confidence increase, and 43.3% saw improvement in their personal satisfaction.

An example of mentoring success can, instead, be found in the University of California’s study: their mentoring program for new teachers returned $1.5 dollars per $1 spent. 

“Mentoring and coaching should be considered a perk of any job,” writes Jennifer Zeidler. “While free lunches and gym memberships are certainly good for recruitment and company culture, younger professionals actually prefer coaching over any other benefit.”

Yet, although seeing a dramatic increase in the overall number of business coaches, making up for an industry worth $2.4B in the U.S. alone, over 40% of organizations haven’t yet adopted coaching as part of their process.

And coaching programs aren’t the only ones being underutilized.

Around 70% of Fortune 500 companies already do have a mentoring program, but not everyone is doing it properly. Some of these mentoring programs are based on old ideas of how jobs and careers work. Some only include the top 20% of their younger hires, whereas all the professionals in your company need mentoring that’s customized to their individual needs. Regardless of what the issue is, poor mentoring programs lead to strong emotional and behavioral responses in your workforce.

During an interview, Amy Zimmerman, Head of People Operations at Kabbage, said: “Businesses have a great opportunity to provide everyone in their company the benefit of mentorship — from the founders to the interns. The data shows such mentorship can be critical for success. We offer this perk at Kabbage and have seen great success with it. It’s also an affordable benefit that businesses can easily leverage.”
Especially in smaller firms, a commitment to training and development can be a differentiator in markets in which usually the higher salary got the better candidate: it can help you attract the top talent you need. The same talent you’ll want to retain, especially when considering how expensive employee turnover truly is, with total costs ranging from 90% to 200% of your employee’s annual salary.

In his book Evidence-Based Recruiting, Atta Tarki claims from the very foreword that the key to maintaining a sustainable advantage in today’s economy is talent. Not even average talent, but star talent. You want the top performers to work for your organization! It’s vital to know how to attract star performers like the ones that Atta Tarki refers to. You do so by offering them attractive positions for their needs to be met. But that alone won’t cut it. You must also welcome the talent in your organization with top-notch Candidate Experience, and learn how to retain them! Only this way, you’ll take care of your People Experience from hire to retire, securing their valuable presence at your company.

Star performers’ desire for mentoring and coaching is on the rise, and the benefits of investing in both are clear. So, what are you waiting for? It’s your time to lead the way.